HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Engineering Materials
How to Transmit Light Instead of Electricity on PC Boards
3/14/2013

A new silicone-based material developed by Dow Corning and IBM promises to enable flexible, stable, and easily processable board-level optical waveguides, like the prototype shown here, for high-speed data transfer.  (Source: IBM Research)
A new silicone-based material developed by Dow Corning and IBM promises to enable flexible, stable, and easily processable board-level optical waveguides, like the prototype shown here, for high-speed data transfer.
(Source: IBM Research)

Return to Article

View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 4/4
Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Mode of Data transfer
Ann R. Thryft   3/15/2013 12:24:28 PM
NO RATINGS
Mydesign, the idea is definitely revolutionary, although it isn't new, as we see from 10 years of research. But copper doesn't complete disappear from the board--not yet, anyway.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Informative
Ann R. Thryft   3/15/2013 12:23:53 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks, Chuck. Looks to me like some patient, careful R&D on the part of two big companies that know how to do patient, careful R&D and have the deep pockets for it. Plus how to come up with a practical solution that addresses all the challenges. I don't see that very often.

Nancy Golden
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Informative
Nancy Golden   3/15/2013 9:30:03 AM
NO RATINGS
I agree Charles - we have been hearing of this technology for years - transmitting light to carry data in computers. It's nice to see someone is working on a solution and it is starting to become something that may be marketable in the near future...

Mydesign
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Informative
Mydesign   3/15/2013 5:20:15 AM
NO RATINGS
1 saves
Ann, there is no doubt that light can carry more information at a higher speed. Moreover, I think signal losses are also very less and what about the cost factor when compare with the conventional method of data transfer.

Mydesign
User Rank
Platinum
Mode of Data transfer
Mydesign   3/15/2013 5:17:10 AM
NO RATINGS
"Although fiber optics has replaced copper wires for communications connections outside the system, the time has come to move those speed advantages inside to board and chip data interconnects."

Ann you are right, in most of the high speed data connectivity, all copper/coaxial cables are replaced by optical fibers. I think the next stage is transferring data through laser or light.

78RPM
User Rank
Gold
Re: Informative
78RPM   3/14/2013 10:53:16 PM
NO RATINGS
Hmm. Maybe Corning is less boring an investment than we thought.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Informative
Charles Murray   3/14/2013 3:37:12 PM
Great story, Ann. Reading it -- especially the part about the cost advantages -- makes me wonder what's holding this technology back. Sure seems like there should be a market for it.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Informative
Ann R. Thryft   3/14/2013 1:25:11 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks, Elizabeth. Summarizing these technologies can be quite a challenge. This one is especially exciting because it's been worked on for so long, and has great promise.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Informative
Elizabeth M   3/14/2013 12:46:54 PM
NO RATINGS
Informative article on something I didn't know much about. As usual, Ann, you write about complexity in a way even non-technical people can understand.

<<  <  Page 4/4
Partner Zone
More Blogs from Engineering Materials
Optomec's third America Makes project for metal 3D printing teams the LENS process company with GE Aviation, Lockheed, and other big aerospace names to develop guidelines for repairing high-value flight-critical Air Force components.
Lots of people who write about robots say they give us jobs, instead of taking them away from humans. Based on the evidence in some recent studies, I'm not so sure.
A self-propelled robot developed by a team of researchers headed by MIT promises to detect leaks quickly and accurately in gas pipelines, eliminating the likelihood of dangerous explosions. The robot may also be useful in water and petroleum pipe leak detection.
Aerojet Rocketdyne has built and successfully hot-fire tested an entire 3D-printed rocket engine. In other news, NASA's 3D-printed rocket engine injectors survived tests generating a record 20,000 pounds of thrust. Some performed equally well or better than welded parts.
Purdue researchers have used a commercial sewing machine to quickly create stretchable electronics from conventional thin wire and a silicone elastomer used for making special-effect movie masks.
Design News Webinar Series
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
5/13/2014 10:00 a.m. California / 1:00 p.m. New York / 6:00 p.m. London
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Jul 21 - 25, Design Products With Bluetooth Low Energy
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: August 12 - 14
Sponsored by igus
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service