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Engineering Materials
Super-Slippery Coating Inspired by Carnivorous Plant
9/25/2013

An ultraslippery coating that repels oil and water even on vertical surfaces is created with a glass honeycomb-like structure with craters (left). This is coated with a Teflon-like chemical (purple) that binds to the honeycomb cells to form a stable liquid film. The film repels droplets of both water and oily liquids (right). Because it's a liquid, it flows, which helps the coating repair itself when damaged.   (Source: Nicolas Vogel, Wyss Institute)
An ultraslippery coating that repels oil and water even on vertical surfaces is created with a glass honeycomb-like structure with craters (left). This is coated with a Teflon-like chemical (purple) that binds to the honeycomb cells to form a stable liquid film. The film repels droplets of both water and oily liquids (right). Because it's a liquid, it flows, which helps the coating repair itself when damaged.
(Source: Nicolas Vogel, Wyss Institute)

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Elizabeth M
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Interesting stuff
Elizabeth M   9/25/2013 10:16:11 AM
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This is quite an interesting development, Ann, and the way scientists used their inspiration to create such a unique and useful material is fascinating. I wouldn't have even known about this plant, yet alone thought to use it to inspire a self-healing, durable material like this that could have a major impact on future product and device design. I am endlessly suprised by where researchers glean their creative inspiration for some of the inventions we cover.

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