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Engineering Materials
DIY: Build Your Own Robotic Bug
10/2/2013

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Equipped with a variety of sensors, the Arduino-compatible robot lets users add more sensors and program new behaviors. A free app controls the completed robot from an iOS smartphone or tablet, and you can program it for various behaviors, or make it follow an obstacle course. (Source: Dash Robotics)

Equipped with a variety of sensors, the Arduino-compatible robot lets users add more sensors and program new behaviors. A free app controls the completed robot from an iOS smartphone or tablet, and you can program it for various behaviors, or make it follow an obstacle course.
(Source: Dash Robotics)

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Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Bug Off
Ann R. Thryft   10/7/2013 4:27:37 PM
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Thanks, Nancy, that gave me a good laugh. Although I'd definitely prefer something besides "dressup" doll accessory kits. How about making it look like a spaceship or like the Mars rovers?

Nancy Golden
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Re: Bug Off
Nancy Golden   10/7/2013 4:09:33 PM
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Ann, perhaps they could sell an accessory kit like Barbie dolls do so you can "dress up" your bug. For the guys - they could come with sports teams logos... 

Rob Spiegel
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Re: All the little robots
Rob Spiegel   10/7/2013 1:18:56 PM
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Yes, Lego jumped into the future a few years ago. that's great for kids and great for Lego. They had already moved into the space left empty when plasctic models vanished, and now they're grabbing the fun of robotics.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: All the little robots
Ann R. Thryft   10/7/2013 12:38:30 PM
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Rob, thanks for that link. How cool that LEGOs are a big part of this.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Bug Off
Ann R. Thryft   10/7/2013 12:35:45 PM
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Nancy, I agree with you about the "ick, a bug" aspect. OTOH, these don't really look much like cockroaches, though their movements are creepily similar. I'm sure a cuter body could be designed, but not using this cheaper fabrication technology. Perhaps some of Dash Robotics' beta customers will come up with a clever way to make them more attractive and still cheap to fabricate.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: D.I.Y. robots and "skinning them.
Ann R. Thryft   10/7/2013 12:35:04 PM
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Earl, thanks for your comments and glad we can help expand your horizons on robots. Interesting to hear that DIY robotics is growing. It certainly seems so from what I've seen. I'll be interested to find out what Dash Robotics comes up with after they've gotten more input from their beta customers.



Nancy Golden
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Bug Off
Nancy Golden   10/6/2013 5:01:42 PM
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While this is a great idea that could really help stir the imagination with a minimal effort to start - I would like to see a cuter version. I am afraid if I see anything going across my kitchen floor that even remotely resembles a cockroach - it will be smush first - ask questions later...

scifi tech guy
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D.I.Y. robots and "skinning them.
scifi tech guy   10/4/2013 9:01:22 PM
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Hello, Ann: long time no post. The robot bug looks neat and reasonably priced too. I went to the Maker Faire a few weeks ago and saw a lot of interesting devices for building objects. I may have missed them, but, I saw little in the way of construction of housings for ro, not so much. You could buy robot kits and Arduino controllers ( and servos to do the moving) for D.I.Y. and I appreciate the availibility. Maybe this is going to be new area of developement where artists and fashion designers could become groundbreakers.

 

I must look at your links for much new material you have. I may speak on the growth of the D.I.Y. robots, as a panel member, in November.

 

Thank you for the site! Earl.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: DIY for future innovation
Ann R. Thryft   10/4/2013 1:51:42 PM
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I think the key is both individual curiosity and STEM. The thing that STEM can provide is stimulation, which not all kids get equal amounts of. When I was a kid we already had science and other cool programs in school, which now don't exist anymore. That's why we need STEM.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: All the little robots
Rob Spiegel   10/3/2013 11:34:36 AM
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Add to all of this the work National Instruments is doing to get kids involved in robot-building competitions: http://www.designnews.com/document.asp?doc_id=268354&itc=dn_features_element&

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