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Engineering Materials

Report: 3D Printing Will (Eventually) Transform Manufacturing

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78RPM
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Re: Consider the process -- not the parts
78RPM   4/19/2013 3:08:54 PM
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Yes, JimT, After tripling my money by investing in Stratasys, 3D Systems, and ExOne I decided to take my profit. The expectations of growth built into the stock prices is too high.  But as Yogi Berra said, "It's hard to make predictions, especially about the future." I keep an eye on game changing ideas.  Is there anything in 3D printing applications that will change the need to produce stuff at all?  Emphasize the word applications. We don't have to own stuff as long as we have access to it. That's true of the printers as well as other things. Consider Zipcar, for example, or websites that permit people to rent out their bedroom or their ladder or whatever. Maybe mass production is unnecessary if people share and rent stuff more.

Charles Murray
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Re: Consider the process -- not the parts
Charles Murray   4/19/2013 8:00:07 PM
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The editor of Wired has said 3D printing will be bigger than the Internet. If Lux's numbers are right, there will be a thousand-fold increase in the market for 3D's use in small-volume manufacturing in the next 12 years ($1 million to $1.1 billion). I don't know any field of technology that can match those numbers.

Pubudu
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Re: Consider the process -- not the parts
Pubudu   4/20/2013 8:49:11 AM
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Yes Charles, I also had a same wonder when reading the article.

Its seems to be right, Many article are there in the web regarding the web. Its seems to be that 3D printing will change the world of designing. 

Charles Murray
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Re: Consider the process -- not the parts
Charles Murray   4/20/2013 11:17:27 AM
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The number is amazing, isn't it Pubudu? If a market doubles in 12 years, that's said to be a fast-growing market. Here, it's growing a thousand-fold. Of course, this is a brand new market, rather than a mature market. But even so, a thousand-fold is an extraordinary growth figure.

Totally_Lost
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Re: Consider the process -- not the parts
Totally_Lost   4/20/2013 2:50:59 PM
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"market for 3D's use in small-volume manufacturing in the next 12 years ($1 million to $1.1 billion). I don't know any field of technology that can match those numbers."


I have a feeling that the problem with this statement, is that $1m undervalues the current market size by probably a factor of 10-30. There is about $1m/yr and growing in just the RepRap (and similar FDM machines) market. When all 3D printer markets are combined, it has to be significantly higher, or it would not be supporting as many salaries as it does today.


mrdon
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Re: Consider the process -- not the parts
mrdon   4/20/2013 4:29:35 PM
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Pubudu, You are absolutely correct that 3D printing is changing the design industry. Although, I do agree with article that small scale manufacturing using 3D printing for prototypes is more practical than on a larger scale. Traditional manufacturing techniques are and will be the norm for handling large volume production runs because of the massive throughput required.

mrdon
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4D Printing
mrdon   4/21/2013 4:08:05 PM
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Here's some interesting research being conducted at MIT's Self-Assembly Lab where 4D printing is being realized. According to the Principal Scientist/Founder of the Self-Assembly Lab, Skylar Tibbits, he defines 4D as time. His definition of Self Assembly is " a process by which disordered parts build an ordered structure through only local interaction." I've included links to his TED talk link and the Self Assembly Lab for additional information. His vision is to eliminate the complexities of construction and manufacturing using programmable materials that create new structures using passive energy. Very interesting stuff!!!

 

4D Printing TED Talk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0gMCZFHv9v8

MIT's Self Assembly Lab

http://selfassemblylab.net/

 

Elizabeth M
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Re: Interesting stats
Elizabeth M   4/22/2013 10:53:57 AM
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Yes, Ann, the consumer space is always a bit sexier than the B2B or OEM space, even if it doesn't have as much impact on a market. Eventually it will probably catch up, but in many cases with a new technology (depending on what it is, of course) the consumer market is really the last to catch on to a trend.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Interesting stats
Ann R. Thryft   4/22/2013 12:34:20 PM
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Cabe, prototypes made with 3D printing have definitely transformed the early stages of manufacturing and design. The next transformation will be in low-volume production parts. I really wonder how hard it will be--or how long it will take--to get increases in both resolution and throughput, especially now there are so many R&D projects going full blast to improve processes and throughput that we might all be wrong about that, too. Stay tuned for some new partnership announcements furthering that R&D.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Consider the process -- not the parts
Ann R. Thryft   4/22/2013 12:39:40 PM
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78RPM, you're right about NASA considering 3D printing for astronauts. NASA is also using it to make rocket engine PARTS, not prototypes. And thanks for the point about the MRO (maintenance, repair and overhaul) uses--the military is also considering 3D printing for MRO in the field, as several aircraft manufacturers already do.



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