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Engineering Materials

Will Robots Give Jobs or Take Them Away?

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Debera Harward
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Re: Fear of losing job is *not* overhyped
Debera Harward   7/23/2014 12:05:15 AM
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Yes Ann, You are right definitely if someone is replacing humans with Robots there will be some reason for it . And as you said that number of repairing and maintance jobs will not be that much i totally agree with you . But maybe in  future any new technology evolves as we know this era is totally technology era and then initially humans will only be required to get expertise on that and later they will be replaced by Robots .

I am not at all contradicting your point I am just trying to say that the process will continue and we cannot completely replace humans with robots .

mrdon
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Gold
Re: Fear of losing job is a bit overhyped
mrdon   7/22/2014 9:47:13 PM
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Ann

Thanks for the comments. Wow, know I'm really intriqued by this blog report. I look forward to reading it as well as provide my comments. You sure know how to keep one in suspense! Ever consider writing mystery novels? :)

mrdon
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Gold
Re: Fear of losing job is a bit overhyped
mrdon   7/22/2014 9:47:08 PM
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Ann

Thanks for the comments. Wow, know I'm really intriqued by this blog report. I look forward to reading it as well as provide my comments. You sure know how to keep one in suspense! Ever consider writing mystery novels? :)

Thinking_J
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Platinum
Re: Darwin
Thinking_J   7/22/2014 8:46:20 PM
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Darwin's observations, in relationship to job creation, are of limited value.

I agree with you, choices will still remain for individuals as to how to live their lifes...that will not change.

At some point .. ( a long way off yet).. society's needs will likely be met with a small percentage of the population. We cannot stop automation in it's many forms any more than we can stop evolution. We can create additional work with "wants" (entertainment industries, bigger homes, more possessions .. creating jobs) but this is also has limits (it will be a long while before we find them).

The question remains: What kind of economy functions under these conditions? Certainly not any previously known version. As we watch the world's economies constantly evolve.. like Darwin's observations of animals.. something better suited for new conditions will be created.
I am hopeful what ever transpires , it will not involve anything too painful for society while making the change.

Now I am going back to watching Bugs Bunny...

Ann R. Thryft
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Fear of losing job is *not* overhyped
Ann R. Thryft   7/22/2014 3:18:04 PM
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You're welcome, Deberah, I think Daniyal_Ali is correct, though: there are likely to be far fewer jobs within a given factory related to maintaining/repairing robots or programming them than the number of jobs they replace. Otherwise there wouldn't be much incentive for manufacturers to replace humans with robots in the first place.



Ann R. Thryft
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Fear of losing jobs *not* overhyped
Ann R. Thryft   7/22/2014 3:12:11 PM
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Several commenters took my questions seriously, and I appreciate that. Daniyal_Ali, thanks for your input. I think you made a very good point about the timing of when a worker is displaced by a robot. An older worker, whether less-skilled or skilled, has built up a level of expertise, knowledge and experience that is not entirely replaceable by any machine. That used to be called "institutional knowledge," and is still valued in some industries and some companies. But apparently not by the hospital you describe. From the workers' standpoint, even if such workers learn a new set of skills, they will come back into the job market at a much lower skill level. Meanwhile, as the BLS numbers show, there's an overall shift in US jobs toward part-time, less-skilled jobs that have fewer benefits. That's not an encouraging combination.

jhankwitz
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Darwin
jhankwitz   7/22/2014 3:05:03 PM
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Charles Darwin provided an overview of the natural order of the universe.  Survival of the fittest has endured for millions of years, and there's nothing mankind can do to change it.  We try to have the fittest support the rest, but that becomes more and more difficult to do as that support breads mediocrity and complacency. Mankind has a God-given ability to choose their destiny from day one, and we are forced to live with those choices for eternity. Until man decides to choose and work to be among the fittest he will have to face Darwin's fate, like it or not.

jhankwitz
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Darwin
jhankwitz   7/22/2014 3:04:53 PM
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Charles Darwin provided an overview of the natural order of the universe.  Survival of the fittest has endured for millions of years, and there's nothing mankind can do to change it.  We try to have the fittest support the rest, but that becomes more and more difficult to do as that support breads mediocrity and complacency. Mankind has a God-given ability to choose their destiny from day one, and we are forced to live with those choices for eternity. Until man decides to choose and work to be among the fittest he will have to face Darwin's fate, like it or not.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Fear of losing job is a bit overhyped
Ann R. Thryft   7/22/2014 1:21:13 PM
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mrdon, thanks for taking my questions in this article seriously. I was hoping you would weigh in on this subject because I know you are involved in robotics, and your comments tell me you are someone who thinks about the social, as well as technological, implications. That's an interesting point about service/repair jobs, as well as robot design jobs. But since robots are, indeed, more efficient than humans, there's not a one-to-one replacement, as the numbers will show in Part Two.

William K.
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Platinum
Re: Fear of losing job is grossly understated
William K.   7/22/2014 1:11:50 PM
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R-M is certainly correct about a lot of the situation. The robots displace the cheap labor when it becomes excessivly expensive, such as when external forces demand that labor be paid more than the value it delivers. That fact should be held out for the unions and high-minimum-wage advocates to understand. 

The facts also are that while it does create one high skilled position to put in a robot, that same one person can support a lot of robots, since, mostly, robots don't need much attention once they are programmed. So one skilled tech can support a whole assembly line of robots doing jobs that humans had been doing. But there is still a need for a means to make sure the robots have the parts to assemble. That may still be a humans job, but it might not pay as well.

So the new jobs do demand much higher skill levels than the ones being ended.

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