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Engineering Materials

100-Percent Solar Plane Flies High on Advanced Materials

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AnandY
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Re : 100-Percent Solar Plane Flies High on Advanced Materials
AnandY   6/13/2013 6:01:39 AM
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@Ann, thanks for informative post. Cost of flight reaching all time highs due to a various factors like fossil fuels costs, cuts in government subsidies. There is a need for alternatives energy resource. Solar energy is potential solutions to cut costs.

Elizabeth M
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Re: Re : 100-Percent Solar Plane Flies High on Advanced Materials
Elizabeth M   6/13/2013 7:28:39 AM
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I really like this idea of a solar plane, thanks for this coverage, Ann. I am impressed at how the use of lighter, advanced materials makes this type of flight possible. Using alternative fuels for airplane travel is really good, but solar power, in my opinion, would be even better.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Re : 100-Percent Solar Plane Flies High on Advanced Materials
Ann R. Thryft   6/13/2013 12:38:15 PM
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Elizabeth, I also was happy to see the lighter alternative materials being used. And I agree that solar power would be ideal for just about everything, if it were feasible in each case. Advances like this one show us that a lot is possible when you combine brains, talent, funding, expertise and willpower.

Pubudu
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Re: Re : 100-Percent Solar Plane Flies High on Advanced Materials
Pubudu   6/15/2013 3:24:16 AM
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AnandY,  "Solar energy is potential solutions to cut costs."

I believe that its almost free it will have only a first time cost of developing the mechanism

AnandY
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High winds vulnerability
AnandY   6/13/2013 6:01:58 AM
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Wings of the solar plane seems to be long and thin. This can make Solar plane to be very vulnerable to high winds and turbulence. How is this factor taken into consideration?

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: High winds vulnerability
Ann R. Thryft   6/13/2013 12:46:11 PM
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AnandY, that type of design detail may be available on the Solar Impulse website. I find it interesting that another solar-powered airplane, the prototype Electric High Altitude Solar-Powered Aircraft (ELHASPA), which we describe here
http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1386&itc=dn_analysis_element&doc_id=264353&image_number=11
also has very long, thin wings, which are typical of aircraft designed to glide.

Nancy Golden
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Re: High winds vulnerability
Nancy Golden   6/13/2013 1:08:11 PM
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Ann, that was my first thought, when I read the title of your article: that the plane would be built like a glider. Especially with these preliminary designs - that only makes sense...not only for general power consumption given the general inefficiency of solar power, but if there is not enough power, the plane can still safely fly...and land!

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: High winds vulnerability
Ann R. Thryft   6/13/2013 8:06:40 PM
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Nancy, I had that thought, too, even before I saw the photos. One reason is because of the background info I read for the story of the perpetual-flight plane: http://www.designnews.com/document.asp?doc_id=253145

tekochip
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A Few Specs
tekochip   6/13/2013 5:34:43 PM
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A few specs are in order:
General characteristics
Crew: 1
Length: 21.85 m (71.7 ft)
Wingspan: 63.4 m (208 ft)
Height: 6.40 m (21.0 ft)
Wing area: 11,628 photovoltaic cells rated at 45 kW peak: 200 m2 (2,200 sq ft)
Loaded weight: 1,600 kg (3,500 lb)
Max. takeoff weight: 2,000 kg (4,400 lb) Powerplant: 4 × electric motors, powered by 4 x 21 kWh lithium-ion batteries (450 kg), providing 7.5 kW (10 HP) each
Take-off speed: 35 kilometres per hour (22 mph)
 
Performance
Cruise speed: 70 kilometres per hour (43 mph)
Endurance: 36 hours (projected)
Service ceiling: 8,500 m (27,900 ft) with a maximum altitude of 12,000 metres (39,000 ft)
 
Compare that to a `172, especially the weight, service ceiling and cruise speed.
 
General characteristics
Crew: one
Capacity: three passengers
Length: 27 ft 2 in (8.28 m)
Wingspan: 36 ft 1 in (11.00 m)
Height: 8 ft 11 in (2.72 m)
Wing area: 174 sq ft (16.2 m2)
Empty weight: 1,691 lb (767 kg)
Gross weight: 2,450 lb (1,111 kg)
Powerplant: 1 × Lycoming IO-360-L2A four cylinder, 160 hp (120 kW)
 
Performance
Cruise speed: 122 kn (140 mph; 226 km/h)
Stall speed: 47 kn (54 mph; 87 km/h) (power off, flaps down)[64]
Never exceed speed: 163 kn (188 mph; 302 km/h) (IAS)[7]
Range: 696 nmi (801 mi; 1,289 km) with 45 minute reserve, 55% Power, at 12,000 ft Service ceiling: 13,500 ft (4,100 m)
Rate of climb: 721 ft/min (3.66 m/s)


Ann R. Thryft
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Re: A Few Specs
Ann R. Thryft   6/13/2013 8:07:50 PM
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tekochip, thanks for posting the specs. We didn't have room, and besides, I was writing an article, not a data sheet :) Most of them are in that brochure we published a link to.

Cadman-LT
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Re: A Few Specs
Cadman-LT   6/17/2013 5:36:44 AM
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Nice article Ann. I always enjoy them! Anything driving solar is a good thing.

Cadman-LT
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Re: A Few Specs
Cadman-LT   6/17/2013 5:39:39 AM
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I meant anything driving solar technology into new areas is always good. Not that the plane is "driving" on solar.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: A Few Specs
Ann R. Thryft   6/17/2013 12:04:33 PM
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Thanks, Cadman-LT. But, in fact, the plane IS "driving" on solar :)

Cadman-LT
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Re: A Few Specs
Cadman-LT   6/18/2013 7:14:54 AM
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Ann, I know that, I just wanted to clarify what I meant is all. :)

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: A Few Specs
Ann R. Thryft   6/18/2013 12:16:20 PM
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I know you were, but I couldn't resist :)

Pubudu
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Re: A Few Specs
Pubudu   6/15/2013 3:29:04 AM
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Thanks for the Specs tekochip it will give more insight of the article.  

bobjengr
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100 PERCENT SOLAR
bobjengr   6/25/2013 7:27:07 PM
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Excellent post Ann and the video was terrific.    One of my favorite people in history is George Bernard Shaw.  He said the following:  You see things; and you say, 'Why?' But I dream things that never were; and I say, "Why not?"  One of the reasons folks like us got into engineering was to ask WHY NOT!   I fear  all too frequently our so-called leaders stop asking why not.  We (seemingly) have become a nation without a national goal.  At one time, the exploration of space was our vision.  Now we seem to be content allowing the politicians to line their pockets while appeasing their "base".  Getting reelected is all they strive for.  

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: 100 PERCENT SOLAR
Ann R. Thryft   6/26/2013 12:33:11 PM
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Glad you liked it, bobj, and thanks for the Shaw quote--he was an early hero of mine, too. That whole "why not?" spirit is what's been so exciting about Silicon Valley (my home "town) and these days, about alternative energy sources, in my opinion. Figuring out how to go to the Moon is often cited as an expression of the daring and ability of the human spirit. I think this airplane--and a few other feats of what looked like impossible technology--can be seen in the same light.

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