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Slideshow: Nautical Robots Go With the Flow
4/25/2013

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The Serpent remotely operated vehicle (ROV) from Seaview Systems is designed for exploring very small-diameter pipelines. It can investigate conduits as small as 9 inches (23 cm) in diameter, and fit around bends with a radius as narrow as 27 inches (68.5 cm). Measuring 9 inch x 9 inch x 57 inch (23 cm x 23 cm x 145 cm) and weighing 70 lb (32 kg), the Serpent runs on two 300W brushless DC motors that give it a total forward thrust of 18 lb (8 kg). With a 0.5 inch (1.3 cm) diameter fiber-optic tether, it can explore as far as 6,000 ft (1,830 m) down a pipe or tunnel. A 360-degree pan/orbit/zoom color camera and two color cameras are included, along with two 70W high-intensity LEDs. The robot also has heading, pitch and roll, and depth sensors, as well as sonar. A fiber-optic telemetry system provides up to three video channels, four RS232 channels, and two RS485 channels.   (Source: Seaview Systems)
The Serpent remotely operated vehicle (ROV) from Seaview Systems is designed for exploring very small-diameter pipelines. It can investigate conduits as small as 9 inches (23 cm) in diameter, and fit around bends with a radius as narrow as 27 inches (68.5 cm). Measuring 9 inch x 9 inch x 57 inch (23 cm x 23 cm x 145 cm) and weighing 70 lb (32 kg), the Serpent runs on two 300W brushless DC motors that give it a total forward thrust of 18 lb (8 kg). With a 0.5 inch (1.3 cm) diameter fiber-optic tether, it can explore as far as 6,000 ft (1,830 m) down a pipe or tunnel. A 360-degree pan/orbit/zoom color camera and two color cameras are included, along with two 70W high-intensity LEDs. The robot also has heading, pitch and roll, and depth sensors, as well as sonar. A fiber-optic telemetry system provides up to three video channels, four RS232 channels, and two RS485 channels.
(Source: Seaview Systems)

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Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Variety of water worthy robots
Ann R. Thryft   4/29/2013 12:35:19 PM
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Rob, you've got it: shapes and their movements in water are extremely important, probably as much so as on land, but with a different set of requirements. The FILOSE fish robot made this clearer to me.



Elizabeth M
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Re: Nautical Robots
Elizabeth M   4/29/2013 4:41:29 AM
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Great slideshow, Ann. It's interesting to see the diversity and technology range of these robots, even while they share some features in common.

notarboca
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Re: Nautical Robots
notarboca   4/28/2013 3:23:51 PM
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Nice slideshow. A very interesting range of design styles and the thought that went into them.  All the sensor payloads are a science unto themselves.  One of the most interesting facts was that one of them had a magnetically coupled powertrain; great way to keep leaks from occurring under propulsion.

jmiller
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Re: NAUTICAL ROBOTS
jmiller   4/28/2013 2:54:04 PM
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You bring to light several of the challenges designing for underwater.  Thanks for sharing.

jmiller
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Re: NAUTICAL ROBOTS
jmiller   4/28/2013 2:51:57 PM
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Interesting thought.  How many of us think about what it would be like to design for robots underwater.  We are so used to thinking about designing in air.  Quite a challenge to design for underwater.  The drag, the water dynamics.  All of that could be quite a challenge.  We'd have to all go back to some of those fluid dynamics equations.  Great thought.

jmiller
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Re: Anti-submarine warfare
jmiller   4/28/2013 2:48:09 PM
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I too have had to spend some time in a few submarines.  And I agree it must be rough.  I always wondered if there wasn't a height limit on those serving in submarines.

jmiller
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Re: Anti-submarine warfare
jmiller   4/28/2013 2:48:00 PM
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I too have had to spend some time in a few submarines.  And I agree it must be rough.  I always wondered if there wasn't a height limit on those serving in submarines.

jmiller
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Re: Variety of water worthy robots
jmiller   4/28/2013 2:44:57 PM
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Sometimes it's interesting how no matter how much we try to make things better, it's the original that performs just fine.  In some cases, I don't know if there can  be improvements, in others, I think it's the fact that the original can do 95% of the job and the other 5% aren't really missed.

 

jmiller
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Re: Variety of water worthy robots
jmiller   4/28/2013 2:44:53 PM
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Sometimes it's interesting how no matter how much we try to make things better, it's the original that performs just fine.  In some cases, I don't know if there can  be improvements, in others, I think it's the fact that the original can do 95% of the job and the other 5% aren't really missed.

 

jmiller
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Platinum
Re: Variety of water worthy robots
jmiller   4/28/2013 2:32:50 PM
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I agree.  Does God's design have some unique abilities or benefits that science just can't duplicate or improve on.

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