HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Blog
Slideshow: Evolution of the Robotic Canadarm
10/16/2012

Image 1 of 11      Next >

The NGC Large Canadarm is a 15m robotic arm that fits inside a minivan when its segments are telescoped together. Although its reach is as long as Canadarm2's, it is lighter and folds up more compactly to fit on future, smaller spacecraft. It will be used on Earth as a testbed to simulate arm deployment during tasks such as capturing and docking spacecraft for refueling.   (Source: NASA)
The NGC Large Canadarm is a 15m robotic arm that fits inside a minivan when its segments are telescoped together. Although its reach is as long as Canadarm2's, it is lighter and folds up more compactly to fit on future, smaller spacecraft. It will be used on Earth as a testbed to simulate arm deployment during tasks such as capturing and docking spacecraft for refueling.
(Source: NASA)

Image 1 of 11      Next >

Return to Article

View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 3/3
Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Memories
Ann R. Thryft   10/16/2012 11:57:29 AM
NO RATINGS
Lou, thanks for telling us that you worked on one of these projects. I know what you mean about consolidation in aerospace companies. BTW, was the "MacDonald" in MDA from the old MacD-D?

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The Weight Factor
Ann R. Thryft   10/16/2012 11:54:59 AM
NO RATINGS
Jenn, Lou is right--the arms are designed to work in zero-G environments, and are too heavy to do any lifting in Earth's 1G.  "Lightweight" refers to the new NG Small Canadarm, the one that will do repairing and refueling of satellites in space.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Size and scale pretty incredible
Ann R. Thryft   10/16/2012 11:54:05 AM
NO RATINGS
Beth, while checking out the latest, NG Canadarm, I was looking at all the cool historical space photos. Then I started reading the caption data and realized that Canadarm, in one form or another, had been part of so many key historical events in space. That's how the idea for this slideshow was born.

naperlou
User Rank
Blogger
Memories
naperlou   10/16/2012 11:39:19 AM
NO RATINGS
Ann, this slide show brings back lots of memories.  One of my last aerospace projects was working on the Canadarm2.  I was with a company involved with supporting the software used to control the arm.  I was at their plant and got to touch one of the shuttle arms while it was being refurbished on the ground.  That was back in 1992, by the way. 

On thing that was interesting is the genesis of the companies involved.  I was doing a project for Spar Aerospace.  MacDonald, Dettwiler and Associates Ltd. was a subcontractor we also worked with.  Now Spar is part of MacDonald, Dettwiler and Associates Ltd.  It is funny how the consolidation in the industry happens.

naperlou
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The Weight Factor
naperlou   10/16/2012 11:31:25 AM
NO RATINGS
Jennifer, the mass is specified as 1,800 Kg.  As mentioned, the arm on the ground cannot lift itself.  It is designed to operated in space only. 

TJ McDermott
User Rank
Blogger
End Effector
TJ McDermott   10/16/2012 10:24:00 AM
NO RATINGS
 

Ann, The end effector used to grab hardware and spacecraft is not what normally comes to mind when one thinks of "robotic" arms (a typical mechanical gripper).  Do you kno how the 3-wire snare used on all of the Canadarms came to be the standard for US space operations?

TJ McDermott
User Rank
Blogger
Testing on Earth for work in space
TJ McDermott   10/16/2012 10:20:26 AM
NO RATINGS
 

The first image of the slide show looks like the arm being tested / demonstrated.  I believe the motors that move the arms are actually quite small.  If I remember correctly, the arm can't really support itself in a 1-G gravity field.

Are those blue units part of the supporting rig, air-cushion supports that permit the arm to move freely in a horizontal plane?

 

 

Jennifer Campbell
User Rank
Gold
The Weight Factor
Jennifer Campbell   10/16/2012 7:27:00 AM
NO RATINGS
I see the term "lightweight" used in one of the slides - how much do these weigh?

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Size and scale pretty incredible
Beth Stackpole   10/16/2012 7:12:02 AM
NO RATINGS
With the photos stacked up like that, it's pretty incredible to see how far the space arm has come in terms of form, functionality, and in particular, size. Specifically, it strikes me as to how large the robotic manipulators are when viewed in the first slide in some sort of facility on earth vs. when they are viewed within the context of the vastness of outer space. Cool slide show.

<<  <  Page 3/3
Partner Zone
More Blogs
An Israeli design student has created a series of unique pieces of jewelry that can harvest energy from default movements of the body and even use human blood as a way to conduct energy.
If you see a hitchhiker along the road in Canada this summer, it may not be human. That’s because a robot is thumbing its way across our neighbor to the north as part of a collaborative research project by several Canadian universities.
Stanford University researchers have found a way to realize what’s been called the “Holy Grail” of battery-design research -- designing a pure lithium anode for lithium-based batteries. The design has great potential to provide unprecedented efficiency and performance in lithium-based batteries that could substantially drive down the cost of electric vehicles and solve the charging problems associated with smartphones.
Help us recognize engineers who are ahead of the trends and making big moves in the design engineering community.
Robots in films during the 2000s hit the big time; no longer are they the sidekicks of nerdy character actors. Robots we see on the big screen in recent years include Nicole Kidman, Arnold Schwarzenegger, and Eddie Murphy. Top star of the era, Will Smith, takes a spin as a robot investigator in I, Robot. Robots (or androids or cyborgs) are fully mainstream in the 2000s.
Design News Webinar Series
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
5/13/2014 10:00 a.m. California / 1:00 p.m. New York / 6:00 p.m. London
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Aug 18 - 22, Embedded Software Development With Python & the Raspberry Pi
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: September 30 - October 2
Sponsored by Altera
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service