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Want to Track Sharks? There's an App for That
8/28/2012

The solar-powered Wave Glider includes an acoustic receiver that tracks the location of sharks. Information from the tags is transmitted along a network of buoys in areas where sharks are known to congregate and connects to an iPhone/iPad app so users also can follow the sharks, as well as view interactive maps and information about them.   (Source: Stanford University)
The solar-powered Wave Glider includes an acoustic receiver that tracks the location of sharks. Information from the tags is transmitted along a network of buoys in areas where sharks are known to congregate and connects to an iPhone/iPad app so users also can follow the sharks, as well as view interactive maps and information about them.
(Source: Stanford University)

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Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Tracking tagged sharks
Ann R. Thryft   9/7/2012 1:35:27 PM
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Some adult land animals, especially cats large and small, like to play with all sorts of objects. So do dolphins. I see a lot of damage potential out there.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Tracking tagged sharks
Rob Spiegel   9/7/2012 12:55:14 PM
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Ann, my guess is that wouldn't be a problem. Critters tend to not to try to prey upon inert objects -- like a dog not taking a child's toy seriously. While the robot could possibly scare a smaller creature, I don't think it would attract a larger creature. Of course, when it comes to young animals that like to play, all bets are off.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Tracking tagged sharks
Ann R. Thryft   9/6/2012 5:09:51 PM
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But if robots are made cute and friendly to not scare smaller critters that won't keep them from being damaged by bigger ones. I don't see how to get around that, since nature isn't exactly a controlled environment.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Tracking tagged sharks
Rob Spiegel   9/5/2012 12:27:37 PM
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That's an interesting link, Ann, and an interesting idea. As for robots in the natural world, you're probably right. Making the robots less threatening could be a big step forward.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Tracking tagged sharks
Ann R. Thryft   9/5/2012 12:23:11 PM
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Rob, while robots tracking wildlife seems initially like a no-brainer,  on second thought I have some doubts, at least if the robots need to get close to birds and animals. Big animals, like sharks, might just chew them up.
As I pointed out in another discussion thread, artificial critters would probably scare most birds and many smaller animals, at least if they acted like machines. I wonder if the work that went into Survivor Buddy's interface and body language to make it friendlier to humans, as we discussed here
http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1386&doc_id=247687&image_number=4
could be applied to the same for wild animals.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Tracking tagged sharks
Rob Spiegel   9/4/2012 3:07:47 PM
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Ann, I'll bet this is just the beginning of the use of robots to track wildlife. This could work just as well in tracking bear and mountain lions on land.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Tracking tagged sharks
Ann R. Thryft   9/4/2012 12:29:24 PM
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The Wave Glider is pretty amazing. It's won world distance records for unmanned devices, traveling more than 3,200 nautical miles across the Pacific Ocean. You can check out its specs here: http://liquidr.com/technology/wave-glider-specifications/ which is why we included it in our Nautical Robots slideshow: http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1386&doc_id=246206&image_number=3

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Tracking tagged sharks
Ann R. Thryft   9/4/2012 12:28:33 PM
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I agree, Rob--great idea about robots, especially since you can't tranquilize a shark according to Chuck's input.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Tracking tagged sharks
Rob Spiegel   9/4/2012 10:26:24 AM
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Yes, tracking whales would be a great use of this technology, Beth. And it would probably be a simple matter to make the tracking technology into a smartphone app. The hurdle would be the process of tagging a ga-zillion whales.

By the way, what type of whales do you watch? Orcas?

Beth Stackpole
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Re: Tracking tagged sharks
Beth Stackpole   9/4/2012 7:35:47 AM
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@Chuck: Actually we've been seeing how they track and tag sharks first hand in Mass. given the influx of great whites on the Cape and around the Vineyard. Basically it doesn't look that much different than the original Jaws movie--big boats, big fly bridge, big harpoons.

I would love to see a similar app for tracking whales. We regularly take a boat out to the feeding grounds and do whale watching--sometimes, we've been lucky enough to see hundreds, which is exhilarating. Sometimes, we've made the trek and seen nothing. Definitely a cool use of technology.

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