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Slideshow: Google's Nexus 7 Tablet Teardown
7/10/2012

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The Google Nexus 7 tablet as manufactured by ASUS.
The Google Nexus 7 tablet as manufactured by ASUS.

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Charles Murray
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Blogger
Re: One picture per click?
Charles Murray   7/11/2012 7:08:38 PM
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Good idea, Goober99.

techkits
User Rank
Iron
Re: One picture per click?
techkits   7/11/2012 6:12:14 PM
I agree with Goober99.  I'm going to skip the teardowns from now on.  

I already know what a screwdriver looks like...

robatnorcross
User Rank
Gold
Re: Business plans of Google through Nexus7
robatnorcross   7/11/2012 5:51:02 PM
For the life of me I can't figure what anyone (engineers) do with one of these things. It won't run any CAD programs I use. I can't type on it like I can on any other REAL computer. It has a battery that God-help-you when it needs changing.

These things need to be made of 100% bio-degradeable material so that 500 years from now someone digging around a previously used land fill won't find them.

The only people I know (non engineering types) play games on them. If I want to just "play" with the computer I draw/design something, many of the things which I never actually make but it makes my brain feel good.

I can only figure that Google ran out of warehouse space to store the tons of money they must have. After all they recently invested a billion or so in a company that makes new pictures look old.

Or maybe it's just me that's getting old.

goober99
User Rank
Iron
One picture per click?
goober99   7/11/2012 4:31:12 PM
For my introductory comment to DN, I'd like to ask if the DN web designers realize that they can put more than one picture on a page?

I can only assume they do this to somehow bump up their click numbers to advertisers?

Coming soon, 300 click teardowns...

1 of 300 -  Top left screw removed

2 of 300 - Top right screw removed

tluxon
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Business plans of Google through Nexus7
tluxon   7/11/2012 1:17:48 PM
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Well, one thing I believe is a factor is that Google is planning to upsell the 16GB version for a better profit margin to help offset the lack of profit in the 8GB version.

Ken E.
User Rank
Gold
Still waiting to see one put back together again!
Ken E.   7/11/2012 11:32:42 AM
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Is this teardown another 'resolutely broken' piece of hardware?  I'm still waiting for them to come up with one that can be repaired/reassembled by a yuck like me.  Particularly that front glass.  I have just seen so many of these tablets and phones junked on account of a cracked screen.  Sure, $200 bucks is 'cheap', but it still breaks your heart when you drop it and have no options.

ervin0072002
User Rank
Gold
Win, Linux, and now Android
ervin0072002   7/11/2012 9:36:17 AM
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My first computer had windows 2000. (Yes I was in high school back then) I fell in love with windows (blue screen aside) then i learned about Linux and started using Ubuntu (very slim OS runs wonders on my old windows machine even to this day). For about 4 years now I have played with Linux too. While they do not have the same amount of software available Linux is still a good OS. However with the craze of tablets and smart phones android is becoming a great buy (sorry apple I still don't believe that a billion useless apps are a good enough reason to purchase your overpriced hardware which you build with slave labor or almost slave labor) the Google app store while still maturing it is great. Everything is slim and basics. I assumed that eventually we had to take a step back and stop ourselves from building larger slower clunky software!!! This is it "Android". The hardware is great too however its largely so succesful due to the software.

Beth Stackpole
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Blogger
Re: Unbelievable complexity in a small package
Beth Stackpole   7/11/2012 8:29:10 AM
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Toss that Kindle, Chuck. At this point, it's antiquated technology. Time to buy one at another auction.

Mydesign
User Rank
Platinum
Business plans of Google through Nexus7
Mydesign   7/11/2012 1:16:34 AM
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1 saves
Allan, for a fair price of $199, I feels Nexus 7 is worth. But I don't know how Google is able to deliver it for such a lower price by meeting all its specifications. Amazon has a different policy, even though they are selling Fire for $200, they are selling many items from Amazon.com through Fire. So they are considering Fire as a platform for business with customers. Google have any similar plan through Google play?

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Unbelievable complexity in a small package
Charles Murray   7/10/2012 7:46:59 PM
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I have a Kindle that I bought at a charity auction in February, 2011. I hoping to use it one day soon, if I can ever find it.

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