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Slideshow: Flying Robots Take Action
6/12/2013

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The Nano Air Vehicle, a DARPA-funded hummingbird-like demonstrator robot made by AeroVironment, flaps its wings to fly in any direction. The remote-controlled Nano can hover with precision like the real bird, and it can fly clockwise and counterclockwise. It weighs 19gm (0.67oz), including batteries, video camera, motors, and communications systems, and it has a wingspan of 16cm (6.3 inches). Its size and weight are within the range of real hummingbirds, and, like them, it uses its wings for control and propulsion. The Nano can hover continuously on its own power source for eight minutes. It can shift from hovering to a forward flight speed of 17.7kph (11mph). While hovering, the Nano can tolerate side wind gusts of up to 8kph (5mph)without losing more than 1m (3.28 feet) of altitude.(Source: AeroVironment)
The Nano Air Vehicle, a DARPA-funded hummingbird-like demonstrator robot made by AeroVironment, flaps its wings to fly in any direction. The remote-controlled Nano can hover with precision like the real bird, and it can fly clockwise and counterclockwise. It weighs 19gm (0.67oz), including batteries, video camera, motors, and communications systems, and it has a wingspan of 16cm (6.3 inches). Its size and weight are within the range of real hummingbirds, and, like them, it uses its wings for control and propulsion. The Nano can hover continuously on its own power source for eight minutes. It can shift from hovering to a forward flight speed of 17.7kph (11mph). While hovering, the Nano can tolerate side wind gusts of up to 8kph (5mph)
without losing more than 1m (3.28 feet) of altitude.
(Source: AeroVironment)

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Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Flying Robots
Ann R. Thryft   6/19/2013 11:53:26 AM
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Deberah, if you remember the name of that flying fish robot, please let us know or post a link. We might be abel to use it in a future nautical robot slideshow.



Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Flying Robots
Ann R. Thryft   6/25/2013 12:04:11 PM
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Rob, you've got me curious. What's weird about the new penny?

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Flying Robots
Rob Spiegel   6/25/2013 3:17:13 PM
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To me, the 2013 penny feels like it's made out of a different, lighter material. The first time I held one, I thought it was a fake. I couldn't find anything online, however, that indicates it's made of different material.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Flying Robots
Ann R. Thryft   6/25/2013 3:20:20 PM
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Rob, thanks for the explanation. Guess I haven't seen any yet, since I usually notice things like that.

Cabe Atwell
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Re: Flying Robots
Cabe Atwell   6/27/2013 11:08:04 PM
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I think this is what you may looking for and it's simply called the 'jumpglider' from Stanford University:

http://bdml.stanford.edu/uploads/Main/PerchingPublications/Jumpgliding.pdf

 

C

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Flying Robots
Ann R. Thryft   6/28/2013 11:54:28 AM
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Cabe, thanks! I don't know if this is the one Deberah was thinking of, but I can use it for future slideshows. It does look a bit like a flying fish.

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