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Slideshow: Robots Creeping & Crawling Into New Territory
5/25/2012

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The Multi-Appendage Robotic System (MARS) from Virginia Tech's Robotics & Mechanisms Laboratory looks like a giant spider with six legs instead of eight. Fabricated out of carbon fiber and aluminum, the robot's legs are spaced axi-symmetrically around its body, which lets it walk omni-directionally. Each leg uses a proximal joint with two degrees of freedom and a distal joint with one degree of freedom for added strength and rigidity. The goal is to develop a walking gait system for negotiating terrain with variations in height. The system is based on simplified biological neuron networks, arranged in subnetworks and subsystems to support the operation of another neural network: a central pattern generator (CPG) that generates gait patterns based on feedback from all supporting systems. (Source: Virginia Polytechnic and State University)
The Multi-Appendage Robotic System (MARS) from Virginia Tech's Robotics & Mechanisms Laboratory looks like a giant spider with six legs instead of eight. Fabricated out of carbon fiber and aluminum, the robot's legs are spaced axi-symmetrically around its body, which lets it walk omni-directionally. Each leg uses a proximal joint with two degrees of freedom and a distal joint with one degree of freedom for added strength and rigidity. The goal is to develop a walking gait system for negotiating terrain with variations in height. The system is based on simplified biological neuron networks, arranged in subnetworks and subsystems to support the operation of another neural network: a central pattern generator (CPG)
that generates gait patterns based on feedback from all supporting systems.
(Source: Virginia Polytechnic and State University)

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Rob Spiegel
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Re: creeping crawling robots
Rob Spiegel   6/4/2012 12:02:53 PM
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Yes, Ann, Forbidden Plant. That's where the scientist's "id" ran amok. Robby also appeared in a number of movies and TV show over the years, including Mork and Mindy.

Another couple friendly robots are 3-CPO and R2 D2.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: creeping crawling robots
Ann R. Thryft   6/4/2012 4:19:45 PM
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Rob, thanks for mentioning the friendly Star Wars robots. D'oh! They were not just friendly but very funny. I think they were the first (the only?) comedic robots in film.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: creeping crawling robots
Rob Spiegel   6/5/2012 11:21:03 AM
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Yes, and I suppose Data in the later Star Trek series would also qualify as a friendly robot. But when it comes down to it, I agree with you that robots are generally worrisome. I think of the robot in Aliens and HAL in 2001 (if you can consider HAL as a robot) as particularly scary

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: creeping crawling robots
Ann R. Thryft   6/5/2012 1:02:40 PM
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Good point about Data, although he's more of an android, which is generally classed somewhat differently in sci-fi. And yes, HAL is a great example--perhaps one of the scariest, partly because he has no separate discernible body and partly because he basically is the ship, and therefore extremely powerful.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: creeping crawling robots
Rob Spiegel   6/5/2012 3:31:49 PM
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Ann, of all the scary robots, HAL was the one I found most threatening. One was the ubiquitous power; the other was insidious way the voice communicated with Dave. Very creepy.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: creeping crawling robots
Ann R. Thryft   6/6/2012 4:58:27 PM
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I think you're right about HAL being the scariest. Maybe it's that insinuating, almost snarly, whiny voice combined with his powers of control. I think a big factor is also his invisibility, in the sense of a lack of a discrete separate body.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: creeping crawling robots
Rob Spiegel   6/7/2012 9:34:19 AM
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Well described, Ann. When I first saw the movie HAL it was very creepy. On subsequent viewing, HAL becomes a bit comical. I'm sure you're aware the initials in HAL are IBM one letter earlier. I always thought that was very clever.

robatnorcross
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Re: creeping crawling robots
robatnorcross   7/27/2012 7:43:27 PM
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My fovorite movie was Dark Star in which they sent "Thermostellar Triggering Devices" to "unstable planets" to "eliminate" them (the planets).

One of the "Thermostellar Triggering Devices" got stuck in the bomb bay and guy inside the ship was carrying on a conversation with the bomb to try to get it to disarm itself. It kept refusing, saying that it absolutely was not stuck to the ship.

The errant device had a really pleasant voice.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: creeping crawling robots
Rob Spiegel   7/31/2012 11:07:43 AM
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I think I missed that movie, but it sound intrieguing, and it sounds familiar. What year did it come out?

robatnorcross
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Re: creeping crawling robots
robatnorcross   7/31/2012 8:03:11 PM
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Wikipedia says Dark Star came out in 1974. It's really cheesey (is that a word) but good if you don't take it seriously; excapt for it predicting the future may be. I also like Brazil, one of the best films of all time!! Unfortunately Brazil is happening to us now. Both of these should be required viewing by ALL engineering students.

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