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Engineers: It's BYOD for Life

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Nancy Golden
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Re: BYOO
Nancy Golden   11/26/2012 3:40:42 PM
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Ouch - Sorry that happened! Good point. Since you were at home using your own shop equipment, I bet you wouldn't be covered if you hurt yourself either. Sometimes the quickest solution is not always the best...probably not a big issue with test and measurement equipment but then I could also see someone not trained trying to use something of mine and frying it...hmmm...

Jack Rupert, PE
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Re: BYOD???
Jack Rupert, PE   11/26/2012 5:26:31 PM
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Interesting timing on this article.  There was a discussion at my company about this very issue.  IT (and maybe Legal?) won't allow it for fear that company documents will be available on non-company-controlled devices and so can "disappear" when the person moves on.

For those concerned about privacy (and I'm thinking about those looking for their next career move rather than nefarious activity), I would be concerned that if the company needed to have specific software on your personal device for security purposes, that they would still have the ability to check.  It would just be more difficult for the user to mentally disconnect.

The biggest problem I've seen with company owned devices is for those caught in a downsizing.  I knew a number of individuals who given their walking papers and asked for their phone...with all their business contacts who could help in their new job search.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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Re: BYOO
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   11/26/2012 6:19:21 PM
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My situation is a mirror-image of most of the scenarios posted; being an independent product design consultant, I have all of my own equipment and I either carry it to a client job site or I work remotely on client business in my home office.  So, while all the equipment I use is of my own choosing, its the cost of doing business. Pros & Cons; You get what you want, but your pay for it.

Nancy Golden
User Rank
Platinum
Re: BYOO
Nancy Golden   11/26/2012 6:33:11 PM
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I agree Jim - that is a definite advantage to me also. I can choose the tools of my trade when I go that route - I don't have to try to convince management to buy a particular software package for example. I used to do contract work writing test and measurement software for hardware test systems and often the customer just wanted a turn key system - they didn't care how I arrived at the final product as long as it could test to their specifications and meet their budget. It was really nice to use my own stuff that I was already very familiar with - often I could write lots of preliminary code in demo mode at home and then bring it on site to connect to the HW for debug.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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Blogger
Re: BYOO
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   11/27/2012 1:25:35 PM
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Yes, if your client is "results driven", it allows a lot of freedom.  I use the metaphor of the carpenter's hammer if people question the tools I use.  "Are you concerned that the roof lasts 30 years and doesn't leak, or are you concerned that the hammer was a Stanley -vs- a Craftsman?"

Nancy Golden
User Rank
Platinum
Re: BYOO
Nancy Golden   11/27/2012 3:02:03 PM
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That's a great analogy, Jim - think I will borrow it in the future if you don't mind!

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