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Slideshow: Competitors Gear Up For DARPA Robot Challenge
3/21/2013

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Atlas, a humanoid robot from Boston Dynamics based on its Atlas robot platform, has seven degrees of freedom in each arm, six degrees of freedom in each leg, and a sensor head with stereo vision and laser radar. It is being designed specifically for meeting the demands of the challenge.(Source: Boston Dynamics)
Atlas, a humanoid robot from Boston Dynamics based on its Atlas robot platform, has seven degrees of freedom in each arm, six degrees of freedom in each leg, and a sensor head with stereo vision and laser radar. It is being designed specifically for meeting the demands of the challenge.
(Source: Boston Dynamics)

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Elizabeth M
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Robots to the rescue?
Elizabeth M   3/21/2013 7:13:36 AM
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These are all interesting designs from some of the brightest minds in robotics, and it seems that this type of technology is in demand and innovation is needed. While robots were deployed at Fukushima to help the recovery there, the latest report is that the technology is not working as expected and isn't as advanced at it needs to be yet. This competition should bolster those types of efforts; just depends on how long it will take to make an impact.

NadineJ
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IronMan effect
NadineJ   3/21/2013 9:54:36 AM
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Robots are often in humanoid form in order to be well received by the general public.  But, do we still need that?  If a non-humanoid form is more efficient, it should be used.  Do we need robots to look like Iron Man in order to be acceptable?  It's good to see at least two that aren't humanoid.

One quick question: is the phrase "act like any 19-year-old first responder" from the manufacturer? 

Elizabeth M
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Re: IronMan effect
Elizabeth M   3/21/2013 9:57:32 AM
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To answer your second question first, NadineJ: Yes, that phrase is from the manufacturer. It's not exactly how I would word such a thing.

And you're right in that these robots don't all have to be humanoid to get the job done. Perhaps sometimes that is not the ideal design and hopefully engineers will make the right choice in those cases. Thanks for your comment.

bob from maine
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Re: IronMan effect
bob from maine   3/21/2013 10:28:55 AM
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To continue a series of posts on this site from last year; humans will likely continue to design humanoid robots for many years. The existance of a humanoid, bipedal animal representing the results of millenia of evolution suggests this is likely the best form for optimum versatility. Second, we feel comfortable thinking within the central trunk bipedal opposed thumb paradigm. Makes it easier to model during construction. Like the wheel, the original model works pretty well. Two million doesn't seem like very much money considering what they're asking for though.

apresher
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Robot Challenge
apresher   3/21/2013 1:47:01 PM
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Elizabeth, Excellent slide show.  It's amazing to see the amount of development that is going into humanoid robot designs.  Will be interesting to see how this materializes in terms of commercial impact in the future.  Thanks.

Elizabeth M
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Re: Robot Challenge
Elizabeth M   3/21/2013 2:51:25 PM
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Sure thing, apresher. It is fascinating for me to write about this and there is significant development in this area, something that could have a real impact on how disaster recovery is carried out in the human world in the future. Thanks for your interest.

mrdon
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Re: Robots to the rescue?
mrdon   3/21/2013 3:03:10 PM
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Elizabeth M, This competition is quite a challenge for Search and Rescue Robot Designers. The bar has definitely been raised based on the design requirements the engineering teams must meet. The slide show is very interesting as well. It's amazing to see different solutions to make a better mice trap. I'll definitely be sharing the slide show with my Electrical Engineering tech students. Great article!

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Robots to the rescue?
Ann R. Thryft   3/21/2013 3:09:24 PM
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Elizabeth, when you say "While robots were deployed at Fukushima to help the recovery there, the latest report is that the technology is not working as expected and isn't as advanced at it needs to be yet.", which specific robot technology are you referring to, and what reports?

NadineJ
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Re: IronMan effect
NadineJ   3/21/2013 5:46:22 PM
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Thanks Elizabeth. That phrase made my eyebrow twitch.

At the end of the day, all robots are bio-mimics.  Humans included.

NadineJ
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Platinum
Re: Robots to the rescue?
NadineJ   3/21/2013 5:50:05 PM
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In my search, I found that UK defence technology firm QinetiQ sent surveillence robots in a month after the disaster, according to the BBC.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-13114310

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