HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Blog
The 9 Worst Apple Products of All Time
8/30/2016

Image 1 of 9      Next >

"Antennagate" (iPhone 4)
The 'industrial' design of the iPhone 4, introduced in mid-2010, was a favorite -- especially considering that the same design was replicated not only in the following year's iPhone 4s but (in larger-screen form) in the successor iPhone 5, iPhone 5s, and iPhone SE. But it wasn't without its problems, specifically those involving (quoting Wikipedia) its 'uninsulated stainless-steel frame which doubles as an antenna'.
As GSM cellular carrier-base customers quickly learned, its received signal strength could vary widely depending on how it was held (assuming an insulating 'bumper' or other case wasn't on it) and how the results were reported. And then-CEO Steve Jobs' initial response to the reports ('Just avoid holding in it that way') wasn't exactly helpful either. The antenna was redesigned in time for the CDMA-friendly version of the handset, which appeared eight months later, along with the follow-on GSM-plus-CDMA model in mid-2011.
To be clear, the iPhone 4 ended up selling quite well, anyway. Wikipedia notes that it 'had the longest lifespan of any iPhone ever produced, spanning close to four years and available in some developing countries until early 2014. But those first few months were pretty rocky, and one can only guess how much better the iPhone 4 might have performed in the market absent Antennagate.
 (Image source: By Justin14 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons)

The "industrial" design of the iPhone 4, introduced in mid-2010, was a favorite -- especially considering that the same design was replicated not only in the following year's iPhone 4s but (in larger-screen form) in the successor iPhone 5, iPhone 5s, and iPhone SE. But it wasn't without its problems, specifically those involving (quoting Wikipedia) its "uninsulated stainless-steel frame which doubles as an antenna".

As GSM cellular carrier-base customers quickly learned, its received signal strength could vary widely depending on how it was held (assuming an insulating "bumper" or other case wasn't on it) and how the results were reported. And then-CEO Steve Jobs' initial response to the reports ("Just avoid holding in it that way") wasn't exactly helpful either. The antenna was redesigned in time for the CDMA-friendly version of the handset, which appeared eight months later, along with the follow-on GSM-plus-CDMA model in mid-2011.

To be clear, the iPhone 4 ended up selling quite well, anyway. Wikipedia notes that it "had the longest lifespan of any iPhone ever produced, spanning close to four years and available in some developing countries until early 2014. But those first few months were pretty rocky, and one can only guess how much better the iPhone 4 might have performed in the market absent Antennagate.


(Image source: By Justin14 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons)

Image 1 of 9      Next >

Return to Article

View Comments: Oldest First|Newest First|Threaded View
Partner Zone
More Blogs
Siemens' new version of Imagine Lab was designed to help the automotive and aerospace industries meet environmental mandates.
Here are some of the top-paying jobs available to engineers as they grow in their careers.
As manufacturers add new technologies to their products, designing for compliance becomes more difficult. Prepare for the certification testing process. Otherwise, you increase the risk of discovering a safety issue after a product leaves the assembly line. That will cause significant time-to-market delays, be much costlier to fix, and damage your brand in the eyes of customers. 
Obtaining the benefits of a fully digital plant requires IoT connectivity and foresight in the planning process.
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6 |  7 | 8 | 9 | 10


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2016 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service