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A Broken Gauge Could Blow Up a Plant

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Charles Murray
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Re: It could blow up a plant
Charles Murray   10/18/2013 6:08:54 PM
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I agree, Rob. Your point yesterday says it all: "If the gauge doesn't matter, why have it there?"

Pubudu
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Re: A Real Surprise
Pubudu   10/19/2013 1:48:25 PM
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One of the main outcomes of the audits is to have a quality production. If it does not meet those what is the point of having that audit with wasting of money and resources. 

It's better to be a pro-active rather than being a reactive.

Pubudu
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Re: It could blow up a plant
Pubudu   10/19/2013 2:04:13 PM
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Ron I do agree with you on this, proper maintenance will do all these necessary updates and cleanings.

It's better to those repairs with minimum cost than doing those in too late. 

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: No surprise.
Ann R. Thryft   10/21/2013 1:06:16 PM
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I agree, Rob--even with the source of the information considered, that 25% still seems like a likely number.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: No surprise.
Rob Spiegel   10/21/2013 4:05:49 PM
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That's pretty scary, Ann. Maybe Wika is right. Maybe most of the recent plant accidents have been due to a faulty meter -- just like the BP spill.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: No surprise.
Ann R. Thryft   10/22/2013 11:05:35 AM
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Rob, as many have pointed out here, correctly working gauges and meters are only as good as the people reading them--or not reading them. The BP disaster was due at least in part to faulty oversight, i.e., lack of/incorrect monitoring.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: No surprise.
Rob Spiegel   10/22/2013 4:00:59 PM
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That's right about BP, Ann. One of the gauges was working and indicating that pressure was building. Instead, BP personnel chose to trust a broken gauge that indicated everything was fine. At least, that's what the book on the accident claimed.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: No surprise.
Ann R. Thryft   10/22/2013 5:09:48 PM
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Thanks for that info Rob. That's even worse than I remembered it.

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