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Raspberry Pi-Powered Projector Tells You How Fast Youíre Riding Your Bike

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Charles Murray
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Re: Pi-Powered Projector
Charles Murray   4/1/2013 7:20:31 PM
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 That is the key, isn't it, naperlou? Right now, the technology forces the driver to look down, instead of ahead. Someone needs to do a study on how long it takes your eyes to look at the display and then re-focus on the road ahead. In vehicles, I think it's always been assumed that it takes 0.4 seconds for a driver's eyes to look down at the speedometer and then return to the road. Head-up displays were able to reduce that figure. A bike, however, goes slower than a car, so the readjustment time doesn't translate to as many feet travelled.

Cabe Atwell
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Re: Pi-Powered Projector
Cabe Atwell   4/2/2013 11:19:53 PM
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I have a few Raspberry Pi boards... I only wish they had a little more power. Something on par with the recent Smartphones. Then the Pi would be a DIY behemoth. PIC/ARM/and Arduino dev boards still rule the roost for the most part.

Also, aside from a head's up display, I hope they add some way to project warnings on the road to alert automobile drivers. Then, they have a great HUD system for bikes..

C

Charles Murray
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Re: Hmmm...
Charles Murray   4/12/2013 7:35:47 PM
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If we're talking about commandeering the brakes and steering, I don't see why it can't be done, JMiller. We just need to wait a few decades for the costs to come down.

78RPM
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Re: Hmmm...
78RPM   11/5/2013 3:14:13 PM
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@jmiller, you raise a good question. Perhaps the speed could just be displayed on an LCD. What is more important in cities is to see jerks behind you. Perhaps we need a rear-facing camera that flips the image right/left (as a mirror would) and displays the picture above the handle bars. Hmm, but why not just use a mirror? Maybe some value add could be brought in here using the Raspberry Pi that a mirror could not -- other sensors perhaps.

jmiller
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Re: Hmmm...
jmiller   11/16/2013 4:13:25 PM
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I think there are already plenty of different options that help maximize our vision and things like that.  I see this and other improvements that are an effort to extend the current human abilities.  Stop the bike faster than a human.  Or see something that humans can't see.  Make a prediction on the facts or surroundings that cause a precautionary response faster than we as humans can do it.  I think it's possible but wonder about the costs and value.

jmiller
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Re: Hmmm...
jmiller   11/16/2013 4:14:40 PM
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I also wonder what it would feel like to have a bike brake or steer without me knowing or predicting what it is going to do.  Would it just wipe me out?  Don't know but will be interesting to monitor.

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