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Slideshow: What Does the Future Hold for Man & Machine?

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ttemple
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I have the answer
ttemple   12/20/2012 5:03:18 PM
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This will never happen, of course, but... here it is:

1) Stop all inbound cargo ships at the port of entry.

2) Turn all ships around.

3) Send all ships back where they came from, without unloading the cargo.

 

And NO, I'm not kidding.

Ralphy Boy
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Re: Robots in my future?
Ralphy Boy   12/20/2012 5:49:05 PM
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"So for ever person that works in this country, there is another person who cannot will not work because there is no work he can do (or will do)."

FI... I have known far too many free loaders to be okay with the current universal excuse that there are no jobs. Of course there are those who honestly need assistance (the truly handicapped for example). But my experience has taught me that there are loads of able bodied people riding in the cart and laughing at those of us pulling it along.

Best quote ever... when I suggested that a mobile radiologist who could no longer drive all day get a job at a medical facility... 'Oh I can't work stuck in an office with the same people all day'.

That was 5 years ago and he has never worked a day since, still can go play music all over the place though. And he's been camping too... But looking for work is not on the list anymore.

And there's the trucker who rolled his truck, and made the 6 o'clock news... He's been riding the cart for 3 years now cause... 'no one will hire me right now'. He should be adding 'to drive... so I'm looking for something else'. But that is not his plan... He'll stay unemployed until the checks dry up. That is the system that has been put in place.

The answer starts with taking a good look at who is riding in the cart and why. Many need to be made uncomfortable about being on the dole, but that won't be happening any time soon. 

I guess we better hurry those robots along so they can help pull this cart...

Charles Murray
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Re: The robotic danger
Charles Murray   12/20/2012 6:19:40 PM
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Maybe this is my imagination running wild, William K, but I do wonder if software programs in some of our safety-critical systems will get so larded up that no one will be able to spot big chunks of code coming from unknown sources. I suppose the same could be said of future robots.    

William K.
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Re: The robotic danger
William K.   12/20/2012 7:10:05 PM
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Charles, it is certainly not am product of immagination by any means. There have been large chunks of "hidden" code located in programs since the early versions of windows. Consider that one early version would produce pictures of the programmers if given the correct word. And that was on an OS that fit on just a very few floppy disks.

So there could certainly be all kinds of functions hidden in the huge chunks of code that we have for safety systems now. Look at Toy Ota and the problems that they have had, and their control system ignores the accelleration mode faults. 

OF course there are processes and procedures for producing good code that is well documented, but that methodology does require a bit more effort and a lot more discipline, and probably a smaller ego as well. 

But my concern was not so much about intentional malware as about the code that reflects a thought process so different from ours that it is intrinsicly dangerous. The same as the code we have now, which does not do anything worse than destroy files and lockup computers. Just think what it could do with an arm having a 5 foot reach and moving 100 inches per second. (typical robot parameters.)

ttemple
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Re: The robotic danger
ttemple   12/21/2012 10:25:37 AM
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"think what it could do with an arm having a 5 foot reach and moving 100 inches per second."

 

That's why they put industrial robots in cages.

William K.
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Re: The robotic danger
William K.   12/21/2012 2:34:45 PM
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Presently industrial robots are in cages, that is true and that is why. BUT in the future we are anticipating that the situation will be "robots anong us", and there will not be any such cages. Then comes the real concern that some organization like microsoft will produce an operating system that is so very bloated and huge that it will invariably contain a whole lot of bugs and errors and things that are intrinsicly flawed, similar to their current and past products that need repeated fixes patched in. That is my whole point, in response to the original question. What we can hope for is that all robots will continue to have that big red "STOP" button that kills all motion conmpletely independant of any control software. Not everybody understands the real value of the "ESTOP" function, or how vital that red button is.

bobjengr
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MAN AND MACHINE
bobjengr   12/26/2012 1:56:34 PM
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These comments are fascinating.   When I think of a robotic system I don't think of "Robby" or the "Terminator".    These "near-human" examples are simply worthless.  To me a dedicated robotic system is one that facilitates moving component "A" from location one to location two without the back breaking work expended in times gone by.  These are not thinking, feeling machines but devices that serve a utilitarian purpose and controlled by good solid computer code.  We have had examples of robotic medical devices used for surgical procedures.  This is great technology and can ease suffering if used properly.    I'm all for that but, the last thing I need is sympathy or tears from a hunk of metal. 

Cabe Atwell
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Re: MAN AND MACHINE
Cabe Atwell   12/26/2012 5:38:15 PM
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People die due to robotic accidents all the time. And simplistic automation, probably even more so. I think robotic. However, these early robot companions probably will not have the ability to kill anyone. Or will they?

C

See below



 

Mydesign
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Re: Robots in my future?
Mydesign   12/28/2012 5:22:51 AM
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1 saves
Warren, you mean Mexican labors are cheaper than their Chinese counterparts. Since they are unskilled and unorganized labors, you can avail their service at a cheaper cost. Once they becomes get organized, there after they won't be so cheap.

warren@fourward.com
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Re: Robots in my future?
warren@fourward.com   12/28/2012 10:44:50 AM
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You are correct of course, but there are distinct possibilities, all of which are slim:

1.  Our country could enforce our border laws (no laughing!)

2.  The corrupt Mexican government could clean up its act, utilize Mexico's vast resources for the benefit of its citizens and thus create jobs at home (more laughing).

3.  They could unionize (which means they would have no demand any more for their services)

4.  The world could end making it all moot.

 

 

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