HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Blog
Slideshow: Great Space Rovers
11/20/2012

< Previous   Image 2 of 10      Next >

During the development of the Lunar Exploration Light Rover, BRP, a subcontractor of the prime subcontractor, MacDonald, Dettwiler and Associates Ltd., created the SL-Commander. This all-terrain vehicle is an electric version of BRP's commercially available BRP Commander. It is fully automated and can be remotely operated to drive itself at a maximum speed of 40kph (24.85mph). The SL-Commander weighs 1,100kg (2,425 pounds) and can carry a payload of 200kg (440.9 pounds). (Source: Canadian Space Agency)
During the development of the Lunar Exploration Light Rover, BRP, a subcontractor of the prime subcontractor, MacDonald, Dettwiler and Associates Ltd., created the SL-Commander. This all-terrain vehicle is an electric version of BRP's commercially available BRP Commander. It is fully automated and can be remotely operated to drive itself at a maximum speed of 40kph (24.85mph). The SL-Commander weighs 1,100kg (2,425 pounds) and can carry a payload of 200kg (440.9 pounds).
(Source: Canadian Space Agency)

< Previous   Image 2 of 10      Next >

Return to Article

View Comments: Oldest First|Newest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 2/4  >  >>
Dave Palmer
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Sorry but No Go
Dave Palmer   11/25/2012 12:51:12 AM
It's worth recalling that the CSA's budget is around $300 million a year, about 1/60th of NASA's budget of about $18 billion.  And it seems to me that this project was done with at least one eye on terrestrial applications -- specifically, to help BRP (and other Canadian companies, presumably) to develop better consumer products, with the SL Commander being Exhibit A.

(By the way, that's why the SL Commander has a windshield; as the caption to the slide points out, it's based on work that BRP did for the Lunar Light Exploration Rover, but it's intended for use on Earth).

Since the CSA is part of Industry Canada, it makes sense for them to be promoting Canadian businesses. That's what Industry Canada is supposed to do, after all.  Imagine if NASA were part of the Department of Commerce.

While the CSA may be small, Canada has a larger space presence through a number of its private companies, including McDonald Dettwiler, mentioned in the article, which recently acquired SpaceSystems/Loral.  This model (a significant private sector presence, coupled with a smaller public sector, focused mainly on helping the private sector) seems to be one that some people would like to see the U.S. space program emulate.

(Oh, yeah, @Ann, or whoever picked the title for this article: great pop-culture reference).

mrdon
User Rank
Gold
Re: Sorry but No Go
mrdon   11/26/2012 11:00:17 AM
NO RATINGS
ervin0072002, I noticed the holes and cabling as well. Maybe the intent behind these prototypes is to demonstrate Driveability Proof of Concept regarding rough terrain. Some of the designs look plain but in space functionality is what really matters.

mrdon
User Rank
Gold
Re: Sorry but No Go
mrdon   11/26/2012 11:05:58 AM
NO RATINGS
NadineJ, I agree. Electronic Controls prototypes I've worked on were never designed for production use but for technology Proof of Concept. The cases were made of SLA material and looked like homebrew boxes but the electronics worked quite well under test. These rover designs definitely fit the category of "What If" just by their appearance.

NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Sorry but No Go
NadineJ   11/26/2012 11:37:05 AM
NO RATINGS
mrdon-thanks for agreeing with the point that I made.

mrdon
User Rank
Gold
Re: Sorry but No Go
mrdon   11/26/2012 11:55:04 AM
NO RATINGS
NadineJ, Your point was right on target and you're quite welcome!

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Sorry but No Go
Ann R. Thryft   11/26/2012 11:59:15 AM
NO RATINGS
Nadine, thanks for the Exploratorium links--great info and photos. Dave is right: these prototype rovers are eventually destined for space apps, but their testing will occur on Earth.

ervin0072002
User Rank
Gold
Re: Sorry but No Go
ervin0072002   11/26/2012 1:13:02 PM
NO RATINGS
I am used to a different environment. My prototypes go through assurance testing and have to perform same as the product that goes into certification. there is a large list of things that can go wrong during lift-off as well as space operation.

mr_bandit
User Rank
Iron
What I would like to see
mr_bandit   11/26/2012 5:09:56 PM
NO RATINGS
The problem with the rovers to date is the "all eggs in one basket".

I read about a concept in 1988 where you take a bunch of small "rovers" - think of the RC cars that can bounce all over the terrain or one of the small robots by Big Dog - and a "mother ship". Assume 100 of the small rovers per Mother. Assume 10..50 Mothers. The Mother would land with the small rovers, and act as a home base for re-transmitting signals, swarm coordination, and refueling (electrical power).

The rovers would be redundant - ie 10 would have lasers, 10 with soil analysis, 10 with a mass spec, etc. Mission control would give a target, the Mother would direct the right mix to the spot. Need more laser power? use more laser rovers.

The redundancy gives you a much higher success rate - you can easily lose 10% without degradation of the general mission.

So - I respectfully ask - what is the problem with this? Why not do it, esp on Mars? The Bouncy Ball rover delivery would work. We Have The Technology.

BTW - the "Flagstaff Meteor Crater" is closer to Winslow (20 miles) than Flagstaff (36 miles). Drove past it last week. Also stood on a particular corner in Winslow, AZ, such a fine sight to see.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: What I would like to see
Rob Spiegel   11/26/2012 6:02:23 PM
NO RATINGS
Actually, this is a pretty good idea, Mr_bandit. Not sure it would be as cost effective as the current rover. But maybe it would, With smaller rovers, there would be less of a chance of malfunction since it would be spread across multiple units.

Dave Palmer
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Sorry but No Go
Dave Palmer   11/26/2012 6:30:40 PM
NO RATINGS
@ervin0072002: I think this is a difference of terminology.  When they say "prototype," think "proof of concept." Actually, even that might be too strong of a term.  The CSA doesn't have the means to put one of these on the Moon or Mars, even if they wanted to.  These are basically just show and tell pieces that will hopefully benefit Canadian companies. 

<<  <  Page 2/4  >  >>
Partner Zone
More Blogs
Bigger than an iPhone 6 Plus, but smaller than an iPad Air 2. What am I? If you answered iPad Mini 3, you are correct.
Here are 10 robots that are designed to work effectively and safely with humans.
What if you could recharge your mobile device using the movements you make all day? That’s the promise of Ampy, a new device by a Chicago-based startup of the same name.
What's lighter than Air? An Air 2. Join us as we disassemble the new, shaved-down iPad Air 2, and see whether Apple's thinnest device is still its least-repairable.
Think there’s already a high bar in owning a Ferrari? Well, grab a pole vault, because that bar just got raised.
Design News Webinar Series
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
9/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Nov 3 - 7, Engineering Principles behind Advanced User Interface Technologies
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Last Archived Class
Sponsored by Littelfuse
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service