Video: Making a 10,000-Year Clock

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Scott Orlosky
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Re: Definitely interesting...but will it actually last?
Scott Orlosky   11/18/2012 7:49:28 PM
As I was reading through the posts.  I kept thinking - how about just making a sundial.  There are already a vast assortment of sundial arrangements which are easily adjustable for variations over the course of many, many years and then Stonehenge popped up in the thread.  Of course!  Not sure that a special 10,000 year clock gives us any more techology than Stonehenge does. Sounds like a vanity project to me!

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Re: Long is interesting, but...
Tool_maker   11/27/2012 2:06:10 PM
@naperlou: When ever I see these "Long Term Plans", I am reminded of a satirical article I read 20 or so years ago where a computer made future projections based solely on the data available at the end of the civil war. It got numerous things right, ie population growth and westward expansion, but failed miserably in others.

  The most humorous things I recall were what the two biggest problems would be. One: at the close of the civil war there were X number of horses per person and the population explosion would cause a similar growth in horses leading to the problem of growing enough grass to feed all of the horses required. The author had inventive ways in which to accomplish this, but problem #two was to be the biggest: What were we to do with all of the manure these horses would generate? I think he suggested huge quantities be shipped to Washington DC, but saw that even that would soon be full.

  In short, future technologies may render all long term plans equally irrelevant and foolish appearing.

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Weren't the Mayans first?????
Ratsky   12/11/2012 11:06:34 AM
I can just imagine that 9,995 years after the completion of this project someone will postulate that this was the "Doomsday clock" and when it stops the world would end.....

Charles Murray
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Re: Long is interesting, but...
Charles Murray   12/11/2012 6:03:25 PM
Good points, Tool_maker. One of my favorite quotes about computers is attrubuted to a Popular Mechanics article in 1949: "Computers in the future may weigh no more than 1.5 tons."

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