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Engineer Solves Glass Slipper Dilemma

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JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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Re: Fostering young girls' interest in STEM
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   10/22/2012 1:11:08 PM
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Funny that I never questioned the Glass Slipper actually "holding up".  However, I wrestled with the fact that only one girl's foot in the entire Kingdom would fit.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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About other Fairy Tales ,,,
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   10/22/2012 1:19:17 PM
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There is one Fairy-Tale that I have referenced in the engineering work-place quite often, being "The Emperor's New Clothes".  Remember the story of a unbelievable fabrication of events that only the most royal and eloquent could possibly understand?   How many times have I challenged the Program Manager's Schedule, using the line of the little boy in the fairy tale:  "I Can't See 'em-!!"

CliffG
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Re: What kind of glass?
CliffG   10/22/2012 5:05:52 PM
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Perhaps the fairy godmother used a future product, since she obviously could time travel in this kind of story: Gorilla Galss would be well suited for this application. http://www.corninggorillaglass.com/sites/all/files/GG2%20PI%20Sheet%20Rev%20b_050912.pdf 

RW-in-DC
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Glass Qualities Re: Fostering young girls' interest in STEM
RW-in-DC   10/22/2012 5:36:07 PM
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I agree that it might foster interest in STEM.  However, it might also foster a conversation about translation as the Fur/Glass slipper dichotomy has been known for years (French/English). 

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: What kind of glass?
Ann R. Thryft   10/25/2012 1:25:53 PM
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I had a similar reaction, perhaps helped by the fact that I grew up with Cinderella clear plastic "slippers" for little girls, which were actually pumps with sort-of-high heels on them, as shown in the illustration to this article. That also makes me wonder about the assumption that these shoes have high heels on them. Perhaps the word "slipper" in the fairy tale means flat shoes, as it does today? They'd be a lot easier to dance in, especially if made of glass. Perhaps the enigineer should recalculate based on that assumption.

bobjengr
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GLASS SLIPPER
bobjengr   10/30/2012 5:17:05 PM
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I'm having flash backs.  This is the type of problem my mechanics teacher (Dr. W.K. Stare) would give us on a pop quiz.  He loved to pull these things out of someone's hat and see our faces when we would silently begin to scream.  He was an absolute tyrant when you did not state your assumptions FIRST.  Then DISPLAY your work in a complete and readable fashion.  I can hear him now.  My first pop quiz was returned with so much red ink I thought he bled on it.  Actually, I learned a great deal from Dr. Stare and there came a time when the class was eager to see what torture awaited with the next one.   Very interesting post. 

 

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