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Video: This Isn't Your Mother's Pasta

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Rob Spiegel
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Re: Welcome kitchen helper
Rob Spiegel   9/20/2012 12:59:18 PM
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In part of the robotics world, human-like configuration seems to hold some value. Not sure why. One thing I like about robots that are designed entirely for function is the elegance of their shapes and movements. Human-form robots have always seemed a bit inefficient and creepy to me.

warren@fourward.com
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Re: The draw to this is cultural
warren@fourward.com   9/20/2012 4:24:32 PM
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Maybe if we quit calling them robots they would fit in better.  Just call it a Remotely Operated Better Operating Technical System, or ROBO- wait a minute!  That didn't work!  I better think about this...

Beth Stackpole
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Re: Robots
Beth Stackpole   9/21/2012 7:18:03 AM
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@jhankwitz: It's true that the vendors are making a big deal about the humanization and emoticon capabilities of these new robots. In some cases, it definitely makes sense, especially if there is a scenario that mimics one-to-one interaction, not just co-working on a task. But I do agree, in this case, once again, it's overkill and likely a reason to sell the robot for a much higher price tag.

Jack Rupert, PE
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Re: Robots
Jack Rupert, PE   9/24/2012 2:21:13 PM
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What really struck me was the size of the thing.  Being humanoid is one set of discussions, but full-size in a cramped kitchen seems more like a gimmick  than anything else.

The other question is adaptability.  It seems to work fine for a BIG block of dough as in the video.  However, why the technology can be adapted to other types of foods, it would seem that much else would require more human intervention / setup which would kill the cost savings.

Also, any idea on the maintenance and cleaning required?  (Yes, I know China does not have the FDA).

Charles Murray
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Re: Welcome kitchen helper
Charles Murray   9/25/2012 10:25:47 PM
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I agree, Rob. This robot is at least five times bigger than it needs to be, which leads me to believe the appeal of this robot isn't its pure functionality.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Welcome kitchen helper
Rob Spiegel   9/26/2012 11:39:30 AM
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That's right, Chuck. I find it so interesting when robots are designed to resemble humans. It seems there are very few functions that are enhanced by human resemblance. As an example, some form of wheel makes more sense for mobility than two legs in almost any environment.

Cadman-LT
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Re: Welcome kitchen helper
Cadman-LT   10/15/2012 6:16:22 PM
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I just hope they stop at pasta. I for one do not want a robot cooking my dinner or as a waiter.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Welcome kitchen helper
Rob Spiegel   10/15/2012 11:02:05 PM
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The robots are appearing everywhere, Cadman-LT. There's a posting on our home page now that features a robot that makes drinks.

Cadman-LT
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Re: Welcome kitchen helper
Cadman-LT   10/18/2012 10:43:35 PM
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I know, it is inevitable. Some are good ideas, some are not. If you are referring to the inebriator that isn't really a robot, but a machine.

Cadman-LT
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Platinum
Re: Welcome kitchen helper
Cadman-LT   10/18/2012 10:57:26 PM
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Now if they turn that into a human looking machine that talks, then I guess it would be a bartending robot. I don't like the sound of that at all.

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