HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Blog
When Is a Robot Not Mechanical? When It's an Android
9/10/2012

Made of silicone and rat heart cells, the Medusoid engineered jellyfish's muscles contract like a real jellyfish when placed in liquid and shocked.   (Source: California Institute of Technology/Harvard University)
Made of silicone and rat heart cells, the Medusoid engineered jellyfish's muscles contract like a real jellyfish when placed in liquid and shocked.
(Source: California Institute of Technology/Harvard University)

Return to Article

View Comments: Oldest First|Newest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 3/3
Jack Rupert, PE
User Rank
Platinum
Living Tissue
Jack Rupert, PE   9/17/2012 11:51:01 AM
NO RATINGS
Since the article mentioned that that the device (maybe not the right word there) using living tissue, I was wondering what they are doing to keep it alive?  Is it simply extracting the nutrients it needs out of the solution it is operating in?  Taking that thought one step further, what is the life-span of something like this and how are the non-living parts recycled with new heart muscle?

By the way, I was thinking the same thing that naperlou said.  From the title, I was wondering about a robotic cell phone.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Creepy with a ton of possibilities
Ann R. Thryft   9/18/2012 12:38:22 PM
NO RATINGS
Rob, as I mentioned, several trends are coming together and interacting to boost robotics development, including open source software and cheaper and better electronics (such as cameras and MEMS gyros and other sensors). No doubt motion control advances figure in there, too. Did you have some specific one sin mind? In addition, the Medusoid is an example of the emergence of biorobotics we're starting to see more of.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Living Tissue
Ann R. Thryft   9/18/2012 12:56:48 PM
NO RATINGS
Great question, Jack. I think the answer lies more in the realm of  biotech than robotics, at least for now. Does anyone know?

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Creepy with a ton of possibilities
Rob Spiegel   9/18/2012 1:45:15 PM
NO RATINGS
What made me curious, Ann, was the growing number of robotic developments that don't seem to be specifically tied to solving problems. Seems like a lot of the developments are raw research -- which I think if great. I would guess that part of it is that working on robots is fun.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Creepy with a ton of possibilities
Ann R. Thryft   9/19/2012 12:56:33 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks for explaining, Rob. From what I've seen, most of the new, exploding research is aimed at solving very specific problems, and much of it is being funded by the military. A considerably smaller amount, such as Medusoid, is aimed at fundamental, or "raw", research, but a lot of that looks applicable to some the purpose-driven work.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Creepy with a ton of possibilities
Rob Spiegel   9/19/2012 1:32:17 PM
NO RATINGS
Interesting that the military has such a large role in robotics developments, Ann. I would imagine it's like an iceberg -- what the militrary reveals is probably a small portion of the overall work in this area. A good portion of it is probably secret.

<<  <  Page 3/3
Partner Zone
More Blogs
Valentine's Day feels like the perfect time to get on board with some of the new technologies that will be changing our lives dramatically in the coming years.
Here's your chance to catch up on the best news, trends, and popular articles from Design News this week (ending February 13, 2016).
Back in January we asked our readers to send us photos of their desks and workbenches – and they delivered.
Family of industrial PCs is preconfigured to work with Aerotech's A3200 motion controller.
The US Congress has extended an important tax credit for solar energy, a move that’s good news for future investments in this type of alternative energy and for many stakeholders in the solar industry.
Design News Webinar Series
1/28/2016 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
12/8/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
2/18/2016 11:00 AM PT | 2:00 PM ET
2/24/2016 11:00 AM PT | 2:00 PM ET
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Jan 11 - 15, Designing ARM Devices Using Segger Tools
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6 |  7 | 8 | 9


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2016 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service