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Video: Maintenance Robots Climb Wind Towers
7/27/2012

GE Global Research has been conducting tests with International Climbing Machines' tower-climbing robots, which use vacuum force to adhere to wind towers.   (Source: International Climbing Machines)
GE Global Research has been conducting tests with International Climbing Machines' tower-climbing robots, which use vacuum force to adhere to wind towers.
(Source: International Climbing Machines)

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Beth Stackpole
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Re: Not height adverse
Beth Stackpole   7/31/2012 8:08:23 AM
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Another application that came to my mind was window washing. Would that be a possibility or is it combining too many functions into one robot? Also, is there a limit of height?

HelicalRobotics
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Re: Not height adverse
HelicalRobotics   7/31/2012 8:27:40 AM
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Window washing is possible but not practical I don't think, and the height limit is the top:)

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Not height adverse
Ann R. Thryft   7/31/2012 12:39:20 PM
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HelicalRobots, thanks for diving in and answering readers' questions. Beth's window washing question brings up one I had: what is the theoretical height limit, meaning, what is the power source and how far can they travel on it (or what's the half-height limit, since they have to get down again)?

HelicalRobotics
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Re: Not height adverse
HelicalRobotics   7/31/2012 4:03:47 PM
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All of the current systems are battery powered and have a 4 hour continous run time. The climb rate is up to 753 inches per minute, or 3,780 ft per hour on our fastest robot. There are many other variables such as control range, but essentially our limitation is the height of the structure. We could convert the system to be tethered as well limiting us to that length, but currently there is no need.

jmiller
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Re: Not height adverse
jmiller   7/31/2012 8:20:11 PM
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I've seen a couple shows demonstating how maintainance is done on these towers and the ability to use a robot would definitely be a way to get more done.  No need to call people down due to the wind if a robot is doing the work.

jmiller
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Re: Not height adverse
jmiller   7/31/2012 8:22:00 PM
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I love the idea of window washing.  Think about some of the towers that are completely glass that still use a couple guys hanging from lines sitting in a bucket.

jmiller
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Re: Sealing
jmiller   7/31/2012 8:24:25 PM
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I also wanted to say thanks for joining this discussions.  It's great to get answers from the experts.  So the model show uses magneting technology to climb the fins while you have other models that can climb non-magnetic surfaces?

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Sealing
Ann R. Thryft   8/1/2012 12:04:16 PM
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Like Greg, I was also curious and a bit skeptical about the holding technologies, both vacuum and magnetic, under various conditions. What about rain and sleet and snow?, although the vacuum seal does sound pretty strong. But like Jack, I wonder about the advance of non-ferrous metals.

William K.
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Maintenance robotics
William K.   8/1/2012 10:15:04 PM
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I have seen a magnetic surface inspection "thing", and it does appear to hold on very well. The vacuum adhered robot would be much more flexible as to what it could climb on, but I can visualize a real problem if the power fails unexpectedly. That is a challenge that would need to be dealt with somehow. 

Robots could be designed for a large range of climbing operations, possibly including window washing on high buildings. So there is an existing area where robots could indeed provide a real benefit.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Not height adverse
Ann R. Thryft   8/2/2012 12:00:25 PM
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Thanks, HelicalRobotics, for that input about steel and non-ferrous metal towers, as well as speed and climb rate.

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