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Video: Robots Recognize Human Gestures

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Beth Stackpole
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Taking a page from gamers
Beth Stackpole   6/20/2012 7:44:26 AM
Very cool project. It's really interesting how widespread an impact gaming technology is having on so-called "serious" development, from robotics to CAD software. Kinect-like interfaces are popping up in a variety of different platforms and will push the envelope in terms of helping people interact with previously pretty inaccessible technologies.

naperlou
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Re: Taking a page from gamers
naperlou   6/20/2012 9:06:11 AM
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The Kinect approach is definately an important one for machine control.  It is also most like human vision.  I have seen, over many years (decades) the attempt to create autonomous vehicles and machines.  They often use exotic sensors.  Lately, though, there have been articles about using a Kinect system to drive these.  The vision system is often coupled with a database or model of the scenario.  This is much like what we humans do.  Factory robots are starting to use some of this technology as well.  This is a lot like the small robots that mimic insects, or other creatures.  Mimicing humans may be the way to go here as well.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Taking a page from gamers
Ann R. Thryft   6/20/2012 1:06:35 PM
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I think the key here is the Kinect visual-based motion sensor--a picture is worth 1000 lines of code? It's analogous to talking to your computer. They are both much more natural ways of interacting with machines, at least from the human perspective.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Taking a page from gamers
Rob Spiegel   6/20/2012 3:37:59 PM
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Cool article, Ann. The video is quite amazing. While robots have been used for years in automation, your stories lately show a whole new side of robot potential. 

flared0ne
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Something interesting to be considered.
flared0ne   6/20/2012 5:13:56 PM
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Nice to see gesture recognition is getting up to speed and developing some traction in public awareness. Given the several mentions of various Kinect sensor implementations, it seems fair to mention another "disruptively innovative" technology which handles all the tasks this article describes. Look for and check out the threads of commentary, info etc which were started when a company named Leap Motion made an announcement on May 21st.

Key elements of their announcement: an inexpensive sensor device which enables position-detection, motion-detection, and gesture recognition -- with a reproducible position-detection accuracy of 0.01mm (i.e., ten micrometers, one wavelength of long-wavelength-range IR), anywhere within a "recognition space" volume of eight cubic feet. And a movement detect-and-report latency below the threshold for human perception -- USB comm latency and your monitor's refresh rate are the bottlenecks there (I'm still hoping to hear a stat for maximum trackable position rate-of-change, re effective point-measurement-rate). And an API which uses perhaps 5% of the CPU time on a nothing-to-write-home-about generic PC.  ...Hey, my jaw dropped too.

I am just one of many hopeful entries in their (still open) pool of developer applicants, with thousands scheduled to be selected to receive an SDK and a free Leap device in the next three months or so. Their obvious intention is to "crowd-source" a base of useable applications by the time the device is commercially available in the first part of 2013. Devices can be pre-ordered now, for the impatient.

Look for their website, their facebook page, their YouTube videos, and their forums. Because of patents pending, complete specs and technique info have not yet been released, but there has been some fairly credible guessing going on.

Important to note: The Leap technology will be making OUR reality "machine readable" -- If you can SEE something, you can use it as an input for consideration. No tape required. Anticipate interesting times.

proent@pd.jaring.my
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Iron
Like a Chinese Puppet Opera
proent@pd.jaring.my   6/20/2012 6:02:34 PM
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It is visualising an idea like the Chinese Puppet Opera Show. This is a new achievement, applications of this creation yet to determine. Remote handling an explosive item ?

Charles Murray
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Re: Taking a page from gamers
Charles Murray   6/20/2012 6:57:34 PM
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Great story, Ann. I'm not familiar with ShapeTape sensing. How does it work?

Mydesign
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Robots in Disater Area
Mydesign   6/21/2012 2:11:50 AM
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Ann, I think this is a great achievement and revolutionary thought, where robots can be used in a very human friendly way. I think it may be able to detect the remote motions also, where we can use such technologies is disaster areas.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Something interesting to be considered.
Ann R. Thryft   6/21/2012 11:53:21 AM
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flared0ne, I did see the Leap announcement, but so far it's not a real product yet. If they can do what they say they want to do, it may leave Kinect technology in the dust. Also, as we stated in my article: ShapeTape was used only to test the A*Star system. It will not be required to use it: that's what Kinect is for.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Taking a page from gamers
Ann R. Thryft   6/21/2012 11:54:13 AM
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Chuck, here's a link to a page that describes how ShapeTape works, although not in much detail: http://www.measurand.com/shapetape.htm

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