HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Blog

Video: Robots Climb Stairs, Walk Like a Human

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 3/3
Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Cool video
Rob Spiegel   8/3/2012 2:37:16 PM
NO RATINGS
Yes, it sounds like a much different robot from the Navy firefighter. GlennA has a good point about the Navy robot in that it has to carry a fire hose. As long as it's carrying the fire hose, a power cord is not an additional hindrance.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Cool video
Ann R. Thryft   8/3/2012 2:20:42 PM
NO RATINGS
I guess in a confined space like onboard a ship the tether isn't such a big deal, compared to the BEAR which has to roam all over a messy post-disaster scene. But, as I noted, BEAR can lift and carry 500 lbs without a tether, so it must have some awesome hardware, including batteries.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Cool video
Rob Spiegel   8/3/2012 2:02:08 PM
NO RATINGS
Ann, I found the comment about the power cord. It was from GlennA:

 

Rob Spiegel;  I agree that a tether could be a serious restriction.  But if the battery pack is only good for 1/2 hour or so, and it only carried 25 to 50 lbs or so of fire extinguisher, it is really worth the cost to develop ?  If this robot can drag a fire hose behind it, it should be able to drag a tether also.  Someone is doing the cost justification between an autonomous unit vs. a tethered tele-operated unit.  And they may decide to build both types for further evaluation, or for different applications.  Or they may continue with a tethered unit (as it is now) until the battery pack version is viable.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Cool video
Ann R. Thryft   8/3/2012 1:41:51 PM
NO RATINGS
Rob, the problem I'm having with that explanation is that the Army's BEAR is autonomous and can lift 500 lbs and, I believe, go a lot farther than a shipboard robot. So why can't the Navy's 'bot work by remote control?

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Cool video
Rob Spiegel   8/3/2012 1:29:14 PM
NO RATINGS
That makes sense, Ann. On the Navy robot, there was a comment about the wire. It had to do with the distance the robot could travel (and the obstacles it would move through) while still receiving power. The person who commented suggested that even with the power cord, the robot would have greater ability to move than with a wireless system.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Cool video
Ann R. Thryft   8/3/2012 12:44:47 PM
NO RATINGS
I wasn't visualizing the robot walking in the real world just yet, since this is still very much an R&D project. But remote control makes a lot of sense. Most mobile robots are either remote controlled or autonomous, so no wires either way. I was surprised the firefighting ship robot had wires, but maybe that had to do with its size. Maybe the Navy should talk to the Arm or DARPA, which have both solved the wires problem already.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Cool video
Rob Spiegel   8/3/2012 12:40:06 PM
NO RATINGS
What I'm thinking, Ann, is that out in the real world, you would want to avoid the all of the wires connected to this device. I would think wireless connectivity could free up the device for greater flexibility. I know that can be an issue, as with the fire fighting robot on the ship, where you needed the power tether even though the wire could inhibit movement.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Cool video
Ann R. Thryft   8/3/2012 12:33:25 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks, Rob. How do you see wireless connectivity applied here?

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Cool video
Rob Spiegel   8/3/2012 12:24:21 PM
NO RATINGS
Nice video, Ann. Again, more development that mimics human movement. This example could reallly use some wireless connectivity.

<<  <  Page 3/3
Partner Zone
More Blogs
Hacking has a long history in the movies, beginning with Tron and War Games and continuing through The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.
In a line of ultra-futuristic projects, DARPA is developing a brain microchip that will help heal the bodies and minds of soldiers. A final product is far off, but preliminary chips are already being tested.
New manufacturing is changing more than just the plant floor. It's changing how manufacturers do business.
Venture capital guru Steve Vassallo looks for companies that think about design, not just technology for technology's sake.
In this TED presentation, Wayne Cotter, a computer engineer turned standup comic, explains why engineers are natural comedians.
Design News Webinar Series
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Sep 22 - 26, MCU Software Development A Step-by-Step Guide (Using a Real Eval Board)
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: September 30 - October 2
Sponsored by Altera
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service