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Slideshow: Robotic Snakes & Worms Get Under Your Skin
2/5/2013

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The Slim Slime Robot from the Tokyo Institute of Technology's Hirose Fukushima Lab is a pneumatically driven active cord mechanism. It is used to inspect pipes in chemical laboratories or nuclear plants, detect unexploded mines, and help first responders find victims in collapsed buildings. A series of six connected modules are driven by pneumatic actuators. Compressed air is forced from the main tube of each module into that module's bellows, or flexible pneumatic actuators, which are located along the main tube's length. The Slim Slime can creep like a snake, make pivoting turns, roll laterally, and move with a pedal-like motion that emulates snails and limpets. Its total length is 730-1,120mm (28.7-44 inches). It weighs 12kg (26.4 pounds), and its top speed is about 60mm (2.36 inches) per second. (Source: Hirose Fukushima Lab)
The Slim Slime Robot from the Tokyo Institute of Technology's Hirose Fukushima Lab is a pneumatically driven active cord mechanism. It is used to inspect pipes in chemical laboratories or nuclear plants, detect unexploded mines, and help first responders find victims in collapsed buildings. A series of six connected modules are driven by pneumatic actuators. Compressed air is forced from the main tube of each module into that module's bellows, or flexible pneumatic actuators, which are located along the main tube's length. The Slim Slime can creep like a snake, make pivoting turns, roll laterally, and move with a pedal-like motion that emulates snails and limpets. Its total length is 730-1,120mm (28.7-44 inches). It weighs 12kg (26.4 pounds),
and its top speed is about 60mm (2.36 inches) per second.
(Source: Hirose Fukushima Lab)

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Battar
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Bad shape
Battar   2/6/2013 9:46:14 AM
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Deploy a robot which looks like a snale and moves like a snake, someone might think it IS a snake and set out to destroy it. In the real world, a fair number of these robots are going to get their heads shot off. In a military application they could also be used to freak out the enemy, of course.

Elizabeth M
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Creeping and crawly
Elizabeth M   2/6/2013 6:43:57 AM
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Well, we have come a long way from the Slinky, haven't we? Impressive display of technology, Ann. This design form factor really seems to be working for robotics development at the moment. As we can see from the slideshow, it's quite versatile, which is probably why it's so appealing (if not a bit creepy and crawly as well!). :)

Mydesign
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Re: Fukushima
Mydesign   2/5/2013 11:01:46 PM
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Ann, that’s for sharing this interesting article. So far robots have the role for assisting in investigation and diagnosis outside the human body. With this snake type, they are penetrating to human body even in blood vessels. Hope this will bring a mass changes in medical care technology.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Fukushima
Ann R. Thryft   2/5/2013 5:19:37 PM
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Chuck, the Slim Slime description didn't specifically mention it as being developed for Fukushima. That name happens to be the last name of one of the robotic lab's two directors. The other's last name is Hirose.

Charles Murray
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War of the Worlds
Charles Murray   2/5/2013 4:53:17 PM
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The OC Robotics robot looks eerily similar to the "three-fingered" robots in Steven Spielberg's War of the Worlds.

Charles Murray
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Fukushima
Charles Murray   2/5/2013 4:51:06 PM
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Ann, do you know if the Slim Slime Robot was designed in response to the needs of the Fukushima nuclear plant? Looks like an ideal solution for that application.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Fascinating
Ann R. Thryft   2/5/2013 1:17:02 PM
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Pistol sounds like--well, a pistol, and a very intelligent horse, too. I agree about Roboboa. The manufacturer does have other animal-inspired robot toys in that line.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Fascinating
Ann R. Thryft   2/5/2013 1:16:44 PM
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Pistol sounds like--well, a pistol, and a very intelligent horse, too. I agree about Roboboa. The manufacturer does have other animal-inspired robot toys in that line.

Nancy Golden
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Re: Fascinating
Nancy Golden   2/5/2013 12:49:33 PM
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I agree Ann - but if ever a horse had a sense of humor and the patience of a saint - fortunately my current gelding Pistol does, LOL. Too bad Roboboa is retired - it looks like he could serve to stir the imagination of youngsters towards robotics...

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Fascinating
Ann R. Thryft   2/5/2013 12:39:15 PM
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Sadly, Roboboa is listed as "retired" on the manufacturer's website. I can't imagine why--it looks like a great, fun toy. And yes, I'd think your horses would *not* appreciate meeting one, even after an introduction.

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