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Slideshow: Robotic Medical Assistants
12/4/2012

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Florida International University's proposed PatrolBot will use telepresence to help rehabilitate disabled veterans and police officers. The prototype platform, which will include video, audio, and sensory abilities, will be created by university researchers adapting robots built by the Institute for Human and Machine Cognition for its military-funded Urban Warrior Robot program. The idea is to let the humans perform many of a normal patrol officer's functions at a distance, including issuing citations and responding to 911 calls. (Source: Florida International University)
Florida International University's proposed PatrolBot will use telepresence to help rehabilitate disabled veterans and police officers. The prototype platform, which will include video, audio, and sensory abilities, will be created by university researchers adapting robots built by the Institute for Human and Machine Cognition for its military-funded Urban Warrior Robot program. The idea is to let the humans perform many of a normal patrol officer's functions at a distance, including issuing citations and responding to 911 calls.
(Source: Florida International University)

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GTOlover
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Platinum
Re: Robots in Super Speciality Hospitals
GTOlover   12/5/2012 1:22:10 PM
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Tools, tools, tools. The use of robots, using highly engineered and very small tools, allow the surgeon to do his work with very tiny incisions. They are not meant (at least in the current iterations) to replace the human doctor, the human thinker, or the human controller. What these surgical robots do best is work very precisely in a very confined space. Even the most skilled surgeon is limited by the size of his hands and fingers.

Marketing@Farm
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Iron
Robotic product development
Marketing@Farm   12/5/2012 12:28:58 PM
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It is interesting to see the comments here & to see just how far we've come in developing robotic medical assistants.

Farm (http://www.farmpd.com) has worked on a few of the technologies highlighted here (Mako Surgical & Corindus)! These technolgies are improving patient outcomes by reducing procedure time while increasing surgical accuracy and precision. We attribute these developments to an increased awareness and focus on human factors engineering and usability!

Charles Murray
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Blogger
Re: Creepy, yet nice
Charles Murray   12/4/2012 6:42:38 PM
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The exoskeleton is an idea whose time has come. Although the one pictured here weighs 84 lbs, I could imagine it weighing one-fourth of that in ten years.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Creepy, yet nice
Ann R. Thryft   12/4/2012 2:46:03 PM
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Lou, I'm with you--the idea of autonomous robots operating on oneself is very creepy indeed. Personally, I'm glad we're not yet at the stage of the Star Wars medibots.

naperlou
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Creepy, yet nice
naperlou   12/4/2012 1:50:00 PM
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Ann, the idea of robots operating on one is somewhat creepy.  On the other hand, they can be very consistent and accurate.  If you have a good surgeon who makes you feel comfortable, then it is nice.  This is not always the case, though. 

It looks like we are moving toward the medibots from Star Wars.  That will be interesting.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Robots in Super Speciality Hospitals
Ann R. Thryft   12/4/2012 11:51:51 AM
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Yes, these are definitely not autonomous robots, or even partially autonomous. They're all either directly or remotely controlled.

Mydesign
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Robots in Super Speciality Hospitals
Mydesign   12/4/2012 6:04:55 AM
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Ann, yes you are right. Now a day's in super specialty hospitals robots are using in surgical rooms for assisting doctors for carrying out surgery and pre-post operative procedures. But one thing we have to remember is all the operations of such robotics are pre programmed one and they have no logical or analytical thinking like human brains.

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