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Fighting Product Fatigue in the Factory

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Rob Spiegel
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Re: Thank you Rob
Rob Spiegel   2/4/2014 11:38:21 AM
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I agree Ryanl. But I think we're moving away from the army of high-paid low-skilled workers was saw for decades.

ryanl
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Re: Thank you Rob
ryanl   1/30/2014 4:02:48 PM
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I think the plants are still employing people.  The types of jobs may of course evolve over time, however there will always be the need for people regardless of the level we get to with automation.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Thank you Rob
Rob Spiegel   1/23/2014 12:34:21 PM
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Thanks Ryan. Yes, it was a good subject. Amazing how automation devices are changing manufacturing. I heard someone say the other day, "Manufacturing is conming back to North America, but the plants don't employ people any longer."

ryanl
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Thank you Rob
ryanl   1/22/2014 3:51:56 PM
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I am happy to see the interest and the feedback on this topic.  Thank you Rob for providing me with the opportunity to speak to you regarding it.  I am happy to provide any additional feedback to anyone who may be interested in learning more about what Siemens is doing in this area.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: A more efficient system
Rob Spiegel   1/15/2014 2:21:29 PM
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That's a very good question, Ann. Certainly vibration sensors and heat sensors are deployed for this purpose. There's probably much more. I'll see what I can find out.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: IoT and predictive analytics
Rob Spiegel   1/15/2014 2:13:33 PM
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Good point, Naperlou. Since the intelligence is in the software, it can be delpoyed elsewhere and it can be continually improved.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Predictive maintenance: the human version
Rob Spiegel   1/15/2014 12:27:19 PM
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William K, it sounds like you figured out your own sensor for determinging the age and vicosity of your car's oil. Not sure when we'll see a sensor that reads the lubricating value of car oil, but it's time will likely come.

William K.
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Re: Predictive maintenance: the human version
William K.   1/15/2014 12:10:43 PM
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Rob, On the last car that I owned that had an oil pressure gauge, which was a while back, it was fairly obvious when the oil had changed properties, since the oil pressure would drop more when the engine was at idle. Newer oil, with the required viscosity would not drop as far when the engine would return to a warm idle. 

Actually though, the mechanism of sensing a loss of lubricating properties that could be done in a way cheap enough for the auto companies to buy it, would be very interesting. So please be sure to post that announcement when you get it.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Predictive maintenance: the human version
Rob Spiegel   1/15/2014 11:47:05 AM
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Yes, William K. One day we'll probably have sensors that will tell us when our car's oil has become less effective for lubricating. Then we will change our oil when it actually needs changing rather than changing it at an arbitrary mileage or time.

William K.
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Platinum
Re: Predictive maintenance: the human version
William K.   1/13/2014 8:09:24 PM
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Rob, that is true. Monitoring individual parts can provide more advanced detection, as well as working in areas that have no human operators or other human presence. And once the monitoring system knows what is OK and what is not, it may be able to predict problems sooner.

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