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Update: The Best Things to Come Out of a 3D Printer
9/20/2013

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Architects Michael Hansmeyer and Benjamin Dillenburger have revealed a prototype for the world's first 3D-printed room. Named Digital Grotesque, the full-scale ornate room by Michael Hansmeyer and Benjamin Dillenburger will have 80 million surfaces rendered in smooth sandstone, with certain parts glazed and gilded. A 1:3 scale prototype of the room was shown at the Swiss Arts Awards 2013 in Basel and at the Materializing Exhibition in Tokyo in June.   (Source: dezeen.com/Hansmeyer & Dillenburger)
Architects Michael Hansmeyer and Benjamin Dillenburger have revealed a prototype for the world’s first 3D-printed room. Named Digital Grotesque, the full-scale ornate room by Michael Hansmeyer and Benjamin Dillenburger will have 80 million surfaces rendered in smooth sandstone, with certain parts glazed and gilded. A 1:3 scale prototype of the room was shown at the Swiss Arts Awards 2013 in Basel and at the Materializing Exhibition in Tokyo in June.
(Source: dezeen.com/Hansmeyer & Dillenburger)

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GopherT
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Silver
Re: 3-D PRINTING
GopherT   5/1/2013 4:32:48 PM
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iPhone case with working gears to pass the time on old-school toys instead of apps.

http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:40190

Iphone Case with Gears

 

bobjengr
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Platinum
3-D PRINTING
bobjengr   4/27/2013 11:50:19 AM
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Excellent post Lauren.  This technology is not a fad and the companies providing equipment; i.e. printers, materials, finishing products, etc will be around for a long time.  The slide show that Lauren has provided represents the "tip of the iceberg" relative to items that can be manufactured.  As I have mentioned before, I feel future advancement will be determined by materials available for "additative manufacturing", improving speed in printing and the size of equipment that can handle large components.  It's a technology that will be with us from here on out. 

Quacker
User Rank
Bronze
Re: 3D Printers
Quacker   4/27/2013 9:11:15 AM
I don't think that the people that monitor these comments are going to appreciate it, if I get any more graphic in order to explain the comedic tension that exists between showing a woman's empty brassiere and the headline "The Best Things to Come Out of a 3D Printer," so I'm going to leave it here.

Regards-

 

Pubudu
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Re: 3D Printers
Pubudu   4/27/2013 6:51:48 AM
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I meant more personal care products with is 3D printed such as more cloths, soft jewelry,etc.................... 

Quacker
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Bronze
Re: 3D Printers
Quacker   4/27/2013 1:59:46 AM
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Somehow, I get the feeling that you and I do not share the same sense of irony.

Pubudu
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Re: 3D Printers
Pubudu   4/27/2013 12:12:31 AM
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I believe that it is only a beginning Quacker, and I'am sure that there will be more things in the future like these. 

William K.
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Platinum
Re: Other areas of 3D printing.
William K.   4/25/2013 4:01:23 PM
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Back in the very early 1990's I saw a plastic part produced using the photo-hardening process with some clear plastic liquid. This machine was being touted by the Detroit Center Tool company, DCT, which eventually failed due to managenet integrity problems. But I remember that the part was quite fragile but very intricate.

protoseyewear
User Rank
Iron
Re: Other areas of 3D printing.
protoseyewear   4/25/2013 1:36:19 AM
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My question is why is there no mention of the 3D printed eyewear created by Protos Eyewear in this list. They had crazy traction at CES and well is much more difficult to create then some of the other products showcased here.

edschultheis
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Iron
Re: Other areas of 3D printing.
edschultheis   4/24/2013 3:40:04 PM
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William,

 

I assume that the efficiencies of the near-net-shape welding process are most evident on large parts (like may be used on aircraft) that would otherwise require the purchase of a very large volume, expensive billet of Titanium (for instance) and then 80+% of the material would have to be removed with conventional milling process.  By using the near-net-shape process, the expensive billet would not have to be purchased and I imagine that the total machine time would be reduced considerably.

Concerning the paper cut-out lamination process.... I believe the commonly used term for this process is LOM (Laminated Object Manufacturing).  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laminated_object_manufacturing .  Someone told me that this may be the oldest of the rapid prototyping methods.  I'm not sure if that is true, but it seems reasonable to me.  I used LOM for a client's project about 14-15 years ago.  The client needed a production manufactured, custom designed, ceramic water bowl for a new line of indoor, table-top water fountains.  I created the bowl (approximate dimensions 15" x 11" x 5") with the LOM process, then sanded, sealed and varnished it just like a piece of wood.  We used the LOM prototype as the master for making the ceramic bowls.  It worked great.  I chose LOM because we needed a prototype that was very dimensionally stable with such large overall dimensions.  I would use it again if there was an appropriate project.

Ed

William K.
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Platinum
Re: Other areas of 3D printing.
William K.   4/24/2013 2:50:07 PM
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I was going to include the welder-type of buildup process, but it is sort of obvious, I think. Besides, making parts that way is really not very efficient. At least not yet. But the robotic extrusion method ceratainly does have a bright future. But they are far different processes from the original 3D printing concept.

Of course, the paper-cutout lamination process is also different, I can see some interesting developments in that area. Shades of the replicators in that TV show. But possibly possible presently.

It does seem that now the limitations are software and immagination.

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