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Slideshow: Y Combinator Hackathon's Prize-Winning Designs
3/13/2013

The Tactilus is a haptic feedback glove for interacting with 3D environments. A series of cables can apply pressure to the wearer's fingers to resist their motion in response to pushing against a virtual object.
The Tactilus is a haptic feedback glove for interacting with 3D environments. A series of cables can apply pressure to the wearer's fingers to resist their motion in response to pushing against a virtual object.

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Nancy Golden
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Platinum
Romantic Toast?
Nancy Golden   3/14/2013 12:17:27 PM
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Now that looks like a lot of fun! I am still struggling with the IO Toaster but my son's generation is defintely enamored with Instagram so this is a very trendy idea. I guess since my husband wrote "I Love You" to me out of his leftover pizza crust at CiCi's pizza the other day, there is a market for this kind of thing (and yes, I thought that was very romantic!) Just be warned - to see the slide show you will need some time if you have not registered with EE Times - after the second slide they will require registration to continue.

Elizabeth M
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Blogger
Re: Romantic Toast?
Elizabeth M   3/14/2013 12:56:18 PM
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I do like the toaster idea. But my idea was a bit less romatic---I thought how it would give someone the ability, literally, to bite the head off of someone who may have crossed them. Clever idea! It's always interesting to hear about the latest and greatest in design.

Nancy Golden
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Platinum
Re: Romantic Toast?
Nancy Golden   3/14/2013 1:27:04 PM
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Kind of like an edible text - the possibilities are endless!

Charles Murray
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Blogger
Re: Romantic Toast?
Charles Murray   3/14/2013 4:06:58 PM
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I ran into the same problem, Nancy. Did I understand one of the photo captions to say that someone built a computer that fits on eyeglasses?

Nancy Golden
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Romantic Toast?
Nancy Golden   3/14/2013 4:20:32 PM
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If I understood the gist of it, Charles - the glasses told which direction the wearer was facing...I didn't quite catch their concept either...

scifi tech guy
User Rank
Iron
The developement of Google Glasses and where the idea might be going.
scifi tech guy   3/23/2013 10:57:12 AM
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Hello, my name is Earl.I am a scifi andSci tech reader of many years. The most recent version of what are being called Google Glasses that I have read of is in a Verner Vinge story from about 13 years ago. The devices are called Spexs (tm I think) and have some wild but interesting functions. What is that sapling in you focus zzone? The specs can bring up the data on it, including the owners of patents on it, and whatever else that is public knowledge, or, could be bought. The Glasses in the Hackerthon posting included the ability to show direction, for one pair, and a somewhat more complex ( and apparently functional) example that included explicit information that a computer system was attached to that small display on the developers head. I do not know that it was mounted on the Glasses, or, that it is similar to some of NASA's V.R. gear ( cables and belt mounted hardware.

 

I know this is runningon a bit but I found this idea interesting, as has several hard fiction authors, and know some of the older sources of the idea. These efforts remind me of the M.I.T. Cyborgs of the 1990s using belt mounted computers and heads-up displays ( cathode ray tubes from military chopper displays). And going further into the future: from the 1980s: The Gentle Seduction, which I read at the time, and the move from a headband link to the users sensorium, to an internal link grown by special nano tech assemblers you ingest.

 

We live in great times! Earl Bennett.

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