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Video: Temporary Tats Harvest Energy from Sweat

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Elizabeth M
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Re: That's more like it.
Elizabeth M   9/4/2014 7:54:39 AM
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I don't have answers to these questions but I am sure the researchers do. I'm not sure there would be much adverse effective on people, though, it seems like a fairly benign solution.

Elizabeth M
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Re: That's more like it.
Elizabeth M   9/3/2014 4:31:40 AM
Thanks for your comment, Battar. You make a good point. I am sure the people designing and making these will figure out if they are cost effective to produce or not in the long run.

Battar
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Re: That's more like it.
Battar   9/2/2014 10:23:11 AM
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ttemple,

            I wear an automatic watch. It harvests and stores the energy from my normal hand movements (no need to sweat) The basic design dates back about 80 years. I don't see these energy harvesting techniques as an improvement in terms of efficiency, just as another option. Of course, the cheapest and simplest solution to powering such a sensor is an ordinary alkaline button cell.

ttemple
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Re: That's more like it.
ttemple   9/2/2014 9:59:05 AM
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Battar - I am comparing this to the accupuncture jewelry in a prior article.  You correctly recognized that jewelry as a "design gimmick". (I called it drivel).

This is completely different, in my view, because it solves a specific problem in a very effective way.  You are certainly correct - a couple of turns of a hand crank would put out much more power than this - but this is part of a sensor that must already be worn on the body.  Incorporating a harvesting mechanism within the device allows the device to do its job without a bulky battery or wires.  An elegant solution as far as I'm concerned.  This isn't designed to save the world, just to power a sensor that is attached to the skin.

If the jewelry article had stated the problem to be something similar to this, where the power demand is micro-watts, I wouldn't have had such a problem with it.  However, the stated problem in that article was that we are running out of electricity (a false premise in the first place - as long as the sun is shining, we will have electricity).  And it was sort of implied by the article that the jewelry was going to be part of the solution, which you correctly pointed out as a gimmick.  It would be like fighting a barn fire with thimbles, when fire hydrants are nearby.

Battar
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Re: That's more like it.
Battar   9/2/2014 9:30:14 AM
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Not more like it at all.

This idea harvests energy from a by-product of human energy. Investing a few turns of a crank on a hand powered generator, for example, is more efficient as it takes a more direct route. Here we have a convulated effort to convert waste body heat into electrical energy. 

I'm not the first to say this, but this looks like another micro-energy device which will produce less energy during its' life cycle than was required to manufacture it.

 

Elizabeth M
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Re: That's more like it.
Elizabeth M   9/2/2014 5:02:42 AM
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I think what's interesting to note here is how the inventors of this were working on something completely different when they realized they could use this device for an even broader application. That is ingenuity to me.

Elizabeth M
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Re: That's more like it.
Elizabeth M   9/2/2014 4:48:07 AM
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I'm not sure, Pubudu, I imagine this will be determined as the technology develops further.

Elizabeth M
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Re: That's more like it.
Elizabeth M   9/2/2014 4:46:27 AM
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Interesting idea, NadineJ. This is perfect for an event like that to garner publicity and commercial backers. And as you mention, of course, they would be good for supplementing the electricity needs of the conference as well.

Elizabeth M
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Re: That's more like it.
Elizabeth M   9/2/2014 4:34:53 AM
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That's a good idea, Cabe, perhaps some kind of lightweight fabric for workout clothes could work with a similar concept. I'm surprised if something doesn't already exist.

Elizabeth M
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Re: That's more like it.
Elizabeth M   9/2/2014 4:32:41 AM
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Thanks for your comment, ttemple. I think comparing the two stories is kind of like apples and oranges but I'm glad you enjoyed this one. It is definitely the more technical of the two but I still think the other one has techincal as well as creative merit. But I agree these tattoos are an interesting development.

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