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Top 20 US Undergraduate Engineering Schools

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a.saji
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Re: Famous for Being Famous?
a.saji   9/29/2014 11:08:55 PM
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@bob: Yes things are improving and there are lots of changes. When technology changes other things too automatically change. If not they cannot cope up with the competition. 

bobjengr
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Platinum
Re: Famous for Being Famous?
bobjengr   9/29/2014 8:08:45 PM
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Bill--I agree with you completely on this one.  Fortunately, I attended a university where the engineering enrollment was somewhat smaller relative to the overall student population.  The professors who wrote the books performed the lectures. Our classes were smaller, certainly in the junior and senior years, with 10 or 15 students in class.  Our engineering department also had enough "clout" to attract well-known visiting professors.  

I went back for a visit two years ago when a new building was "commissioned" and discovered the classes were huge and conducted  mostly by graduate students--generally foreign nationals who had thick accents.  Some were truly unintelligible.    I was amazed at the differences between the class structure I had and what was available now.  

Excellent post Rob. 

Charles Murray
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Blogger
Re: Harvey Mudd too small for DN to notice?
Charles Murray   9/16/2014 10:12:03 AM
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I strongly agree with the spirit everything you've said here, Greg Goodknight, and I'll actually add to the points you've made here. I believe there can be an advantage to going to a school that doesn't grant Ph.D.s. Schools like Olin College of Engineering, Rose-Hulman and Harvey Mudd focus on the undergrads and on the teaching experience. For professors at those schools, teaching isn't a necessary evil. It's the main thrust of their jobs. As a result, student instruction and out-of-the-classroom experience can actually be better. Many corporations recognize this, which is why the starting salaries are as high as you suggest. Please see link:

http://www.designnews.com/document.asp?doc_id=219010

Greg Goodknight
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Iron
Re: Harvey Mudd too small for DN to notice?
Greg Goodknight   9/15/2014 8:56:30 PM
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If you notice, Charles Murray, that caveat was not in the text. It was "Top 20 US Undergraduate Engineering Schools" with a definition of Engineering School that, by my reading, also covered Mudd.

In an earlier Design News (May?) blog, the following was written about the highest midcareer salaries of any such school in the country, handily beating both CalTech and MIT:

"Now we're hitting the higher salaries. Harvey Mudd engineering grads can expect a starting salary averaging $66,800, and soaring to an average $135,000 by mid-career. About 62% of grads stay in California. Surprisingly, the PhD grads are not doing much better than the BS grads at career start. But by mid-career, the docs are making an extra $20,000 per year."

It really doesn't matter if one's undergraduate college is at a Ph.D. granting university, with our without a decent football team, as most good ones nudge the fledgelings out of the nest to actually get the union card somewhere else.

Charles Murray
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Blogger
Re: Harvey Mudd too small for DN to notice?
Charles Murray   9/15/2014 7:42:38 PM
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If you notice, Greg Goodknight, this list shows the schools whose highest degrees are PhDs. I believe we will have a separate list coming up for the schools that I like to think are the best -- the ones that offer MS and BS as their highest degree. That's where Harvey Mudd -- a tremendous school -- fits in.

Charles Murray
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Blogger
Re: Gearing for Engineering
Charles Murray   9/15/2014 7:39:03 PM
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South Dakota School of Mines may not be in this Top 20 list, waterman2, but its students get the last laugh. As we've seen in earlier studies, mining engineering grads are among the highest paid.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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Blogger
Re: Midwestern schools?
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   9/10/2014 1:18:09 PM
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Y-O-O-P-E-R.  ( I knew that ! eh? ) ...  I stand corrected!

Mydesign
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Platinum
Re: Harvey Mudd too small for DN to notice?
Mydesign   9/10/2014 3:44:40 AM
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1 saves
"Mudd's ranking for percentage of alumni with PhD's is #2, just behind CalTech and just ahead of MIT, and by the rankings former Ed Sec'y William Bennett has been promoting, Mudd mid-career alumni salaries and the return on investment are both #1 in the nation."

Greg, I think now a day's producing more research outcomes and PhD's are main parameters for ranking than anything else.

Mydesign
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Top Engineering Schools
Mydesign   9/10/2014 3:40:41 AM
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1 saves
"I agree with you as I do not know whether Harvard and Yale are one of the 20 engineering schools for undergraduates or not. It would be necessary to see the criteria these magazines and publications used for determining these lists. Several comments I read show that people are suspicious of bias in the results which is difficult to disprove unless the criteria is known. Regards."

Dodger2X, rating can be based on many parameters. So based on parameters college/university ratings can change.

jrbaker
User Rank
Iron
Re: Midwestern schools?
jrbaker   9/10/2014 1:00:39 AM
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Yes, the SNOW, eh?

And it's spelled 'Yooper'. Technically I'm not a Yooper, but 2 out of 3 of our kids are.

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