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3D Printing Method Used to Create Human Cartilage
7/16/2014

Rocky Tuan, director of the Center for Cellular and Molecular Engineering and professor and executive vice chairman for orthopaedic research at the university's School of Medicine, has used a novel 3D printing method to create the first example of living human cartilage grown on a laboratory chip.   (Source: University of Pittsburgh)
Rocky Tuan, director of the Center for Cellular and Molecular Engineering and professor and executive vice chairman for orthopaedic research at the university’s School of Medicine, has used a novel 3D printing method to create the first example of living human cartilage grown on a laboratory chip.
(Source: University of Pittsburgh)

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Elizabeth M
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Re: 3D PRINTING AND HUMAN CARTILAGE
Elizabeth M   8/4/2014 8:17:29 AM
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Thanks, bobjengr. Sorry to hear about your malady. But who knows, you may benefit from this! I think I mentioned it in a post before but I also can feel the cartilage in my knees, ankles and wrists weakening and dissipating now that I am in my 40s, so I may need this type of treatment as well down the line.

Elizabeth M
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Re: Another impressive medical innovation
Elizabeth M   7/31/2014 5:49:11 AM
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Oh no, that's unfortunate. :( Well considering his age, he may some day be able to benefit from this technology one day. I hope for his sake it and others similar that will help restore cartilage and ease these type of conditions are finalized and approved sooner rather than later.

Charles Murray
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Re: Another impressive medical innovation
Charles Murray   7/29/2014 8:34:54 PM
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Literally two days after I posted my earlier comment, my son injured his knee yet again, and is now looking at a fourth surgery. I told him about this article, and we're both hoping this technology will make it to the medical market in the next few years. Thanks for writing this article, Liz. I'm sure there are many other people who can benefit from this.

bobjengr
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3D PRINTING AND HUMAN CARTILAGE
bobjengr   7/29/2014 5:20:17 PM
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Fascinating post Elizabeth.  I'm running a little late on this one but it's great information.  I suffer from osteoarthritis in my right hip, resulting from road races I've participated in over the past three decades.  I'm now paying the price for all of the pavement pounding.  I have, so far, been able to forestall a hip replacement but my day is coming.  Maybe, just maybe, this development could result in pain relief without the replacement.  Again, great post and very informative. 

Elizabeth M
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Re: Another impressive medical innovation
Elizabeth M   7/28/2014 7:59:13 AM
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Better late than never, Chuck. Thanks for the real-world perspective. It definitely sounds like the technology I've covered could solve those potential rejection issues. I myself am starting to feel the wear in my cartilage so find this type of thing a welcome breakthrough as well. I hope all goes well with your son!

Charles Murray
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Re: Another impressive medical innovation
Charles Murray   7/23/2014 5:17:40 PM
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I'm sorry I somehow missed this story when it originally appeared. This is a godsend for many people who need knee cartilage. One of my sons has had three knee operations due to sports injuries, and was told after the third surgery that his next operation will require the use of cadaver cartilage, which can have rejection issues. If a stereolithography technique can be used to build cartilage, I can only presume it wouldn't have those same rejection issues. There must be tens of thousands of people who could benefit from this.

Debera Harward
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Re: Another impressive medical innovation
Debera Harward   7/23/2014 12:13:47 AM
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But if we are investing money in medical Apps of smart phones it doubles our benefit . It is not only helpfull for our medications but also enhnaces , improves our technological skills side by side with medical skills as well.

Debera Harward
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Re: Another impressive medical innovation
Debera Harward   7/23/2014 12:13:37 AM
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But if we are investing money in medical Apps of smart phones it doubles our benefit . It is not only helpfull for our medications but also enhnaces , improves our technological skills side by side with medical skills as well.

Cabe Atwell
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Re: Another impressive medical innovation
Cabe Atwell   7/22/2014 2:55:59 PM
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That's a shame.. Perfect example of not enough money going into the medical research world.

But, for now, we have relly cool smartphones!

 

Elizabeth M
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Re: Another impressive medical innovation
Elizabeth M   7/22/2014 6:34:22 AM
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Yes, Debera, I agree with you. I actually don't consider it a simple technology now! I think it's really complex and incredible that this can be done.

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