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10 Ways Your Home Is Smarter Than You

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Debera Harward
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Re: BUT Avoid the "microsopht syndrome"
Debera Harward   11/21/2014 2:46:31 AM
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I agree with you that majority o f the developed inovative products become useless after some time but that doesnot mean we should stop thinking about new ideas and technology if some of our technogies gets rejected or useless we can use the same product or technology in some other usefull way

Debera Harward
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Re: BUT Avoid the "microsopht syndrome"
Debera Harward   11/21/2014 2:44:52 AM
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True William these days technolgy is moving at such a great speed that the previosu technology becomes obselete and useless but this is what is happening and we have to move with it .

 

William K.
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Re: BUT Avoid the "microsopht syndrome"
William K.   8/20/2014 10:49:19 AM
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The one line that always bothers me is "consumers demand" something. What it really means is that the marketing people have an idea that they think nobody else has come up with. This is primarily to deliver "product differentiation", which the sole purpose is to make previous products obsolete.

But instead what usually appears is a collection of useless features that degrade product usability and often reduce product reliability. I am sure thatwe have all had products that were very difficult to figure out, where the instruction manual must have been for the previous version, prior to the one that made it into full production. I frequently wind up fighting with products like that.

Elizabeth M
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Re: BUT Avoid the "microsopht syndrome"
Elizabeth M   8/20/2014 6:14:39 AM
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True words, William K. Unfortunately, sometimes it's only hindsight that's 20/20 and even when we try to learn from our mistakes, we don't. Even people developing technology fall prey to this sometimes, even when there is precedence for a product that shows it isn't a very good investment.

William K.
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Re: BUT Avoid the "microsopht syndrome"
William K.   8/19/2014 9:32:47 PM
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History is littered with ideas that did not make it, as well as products that nobody wanted, some unwanted initially, while others took a while to be totally rejected. Some of the rejected products were fairly expensive to buy, which makes their rejection even more emphatic. At least it looks that way to me.

Elizabeth M
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Re: BUT Avoid the "microsopht syndrome"
Elizabeth M   8/19/2014 3:54:59 AM
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That can definitely be true in some situations, William K. I still think some of these technologies will prove to be more helpful than harmful, but the proof will be in testing and adoption down the road.

William K.
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Re: BUT Avoid the "microsopht syndrome"
William K.   8/18/2014 12:37:44 PM
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It seems that quite often the actual benefit is not worth the risk. The advertised benefits are often far more than what are really realized. But the product sells and the provi9ders get profit, meanwhile the consumers have junk to dispose of. But that shows the power of determined marketers.

Elizabeth M
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Re: BUT Avoid the "microsopht syndrome"
Elizabeth M   8/18/2014 5:08:41 AM
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You make some excellent points, William K, and certainly make a good case for keeping things simple around the house!

Elizabeth M
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Re: That's right, the homes are smarter
Elizabeth M   8/18/2014 5:02:27 AM
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Yes, it's true, with pets, they definitely want the real attention from their owners for sure. But Debera, you make a good point. These virtual solutions are not to be used all the time, just for emergency or short-term solutions.

William K.
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BUT Avoid the "microsopht syndrome"
William K.   8/17/2014 3:10:47 PM
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What I see as the probable development in computerized living spaces is that syndrome of a system wanting to do one thing while what we want is something different. The system believes that it knows waht we want and no command is about to change that. If I wish to open my front door without being obvious about it the system would still turn on a bunch of lights, as one example. Or even just moving from room to room without a system switching lights off and on as I move. All sorts of things that are not the usual routine and some stupid computer has decided that it knows much better than I do. 

In addition there is always the probability that some of this hardware, built as competitively priced consumer goods, is going to fail and need to be replaced, since none of it will be repairable. Do you really want to replace that three-year-old $1500 refrigerator because the processor module has failed? Or the $800 internet conneted controller for your climate control system? And what about the $50 toaster that suddenly seems to be having random communications with something else? I see the unpleasantness of failures as far outweighing the alleged convenience of a "smart and connected" house.

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