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Smart Tires Alert Drivers of Dangerous Wear

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AnandY
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Gold
Re: Tires With Sensors Is The Way To Go
AnandY   6/25/2014 3:00:26 AM
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We all buy gadgets and devices all in the hope that our everyday lives will be made easier and stress free. Some devices meet our needs while others don't. Well, if you are driver tired of the daily dose of road problems that tires give the smart tires will surely give you a vacation on this. A new set of smart tires have been invented to help deal with these problems in one very rare way, by use of sensors. These sensors can notify the driver when the air pressure is low. These sensors also can tell when the depth of trend and also the dangerous wear trends. The drivers are signaled by a light that illuminates on the dashboard, which show the need for a new set of tires.

Cabe Atwell
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Blogger
Re: But there is no warning light
Cabe Atwell   6/12/2014 12:38:03 AM
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President Obama once said "We could save all the oil that they're talking about getting off drilling, if everybody was just inflating their tires and -- and -- and getting regular tune-ups, you can actually save just as much."

That's enough for me to do it! 

rickgtoc
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Gold
Re: But there is no warning light
rickgtoc   6/10/2014 11:51:10 AM
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Yep.  A little reality check math shows there's a bug in the figures somewhere.  for 0.3% to equal 144 gallons implies annual fuel consumption of 48,000 gallons per year.  For my 10yr old Tacoma getting 20 mpg, that translates to 96,000 miles, way more than the 12-15K per year that we drive it.

And good automated diagnostics don't replace periodic inspection, but would be nice to have.  And why would they necessarily wait for the auto manufacturers to cooperate.  In the IOT (Internet of Things), the tire sensors could conceivably communicate with a smartphone.

rickgtoc
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Re: But there is no warning light
rickgtoc   6/10/2014 11:51:10 AM
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Yep.  A little reality check math shows there's a bug in the figures somewhere.  for 0.3% to equal 144 gallons implies annual fuel consumption of 48,000 gallons per year.  For my 10yr old Tacoma getting 20 mpg, that translates to 96,000 miles, way more than the 12-15K per year that we drive it.

And good automated diagnostics don't replace periodic inspection, but would be nice to have.  And why would they necessarily wait for the auto manufacturers to cooperate.  In the IOT (Internet of Things), the tire sensors could conceivably communicate with a smartphone.

vipre77
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Gold
Re: But there is no warning light
vipre77   6/10/2014 11:40:32 AM
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Battar,

This is just an evolution of Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems.  Only difference is that it detects more tire conditions than simple tire pressure.  TPMS is not mandated by law, at least not here in the US, where it is often only equipped on higher-end trim levels on most vehicles.  I don't see why this would be viewed any differently.  The only strike against this system that I see is that it's fitted to the tire rather than the rim like TPMS sensors. 

With it presumably being only available on Continental tires, it may be a hard sell to manufacturers.  If Continental made this a system that could be fitted to any tire, regardless of the manufacturer, it would have a much easier time of getting it to catch on with the automakers, I think.

Also, being mounted to the tire, how robust is the design?  Will it stand up to pothole impacts?  Early TPMS systems used to have problems with this, but since most are now mounted to the rim on the valve stems, it's been somewhat less of a problem.  I would imagine it would trigger a warning if one or more of the sensors went offline due to damage or loss of communication like TPMS systems do.

But, you're right that automakers do usually require components to have at least two sources for purchasing/logistics risk mitigation reasons.  I have seen instances where this requirement has been waived for new technology that they want to include that is only available from a single source.  Doesn't happen often, though.  Usually they'd prefer to develop that kind of proprietary tech themselves (see ACDelco, Delphi, etc.) or they end up buying out the supplier to control the logistics themselves if they want it bad enough.

NadineJ
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Platinum
information vs education
NadineJ   6/10/2014 11:36:09 AM
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Having a warning that your tyres are worn down is interesting.  It fits in with the modern lifestyle.  We want our gadgets to tell us things instead of seeing it for ourselves.  How many people ever look at their tires on a regular basis.

I would be more impressed if the warning came with information about how the particular driving habit of the car owner leads to extreme or uneven wear in the tires.  Under inflated tyres cause one type of wear.  Coming to hard stops repeatedly causes another type of wear.

It would be great if the technology could lead to better driving.  Or, at least, more informed driving.

vipre77
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Gold
Re: But there is no warning light
vipre77   6/10/2014 10:47:20 AM
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I agree.  The article's author needs to cite a source for the 144 gal/year average savings.  Surely, there's a misplaced decimal point in there somewhere or they are using some outlandish annual mileage.  14.4 gal/year I could believe.  My car gets no-so-great fuel economy because nearly all of my driving is stoplight-to-stoplight and I average around 9000-10,000 miles / year in my car.  144 gallons of gas would be around 25-30% reduction in efficiency.  In a more fuel-efficient car, that percentage reduction in efficiency would only go up.  At 0.3% reduction in efficiency per 1 PSI pressure drop, I'd have to be 83-100 PSI under-inflated to get that kind of efficiency decrease.  That's kind of a challenge when the tires are normally only inflated to 30 PSI at the recommended pressure.

Someone below suggested linking this sensor to an engine immobilizer rather than simply giving a warning light.  I disagree.  It'd be preferable to have it talking to the ECU to force the car into a Limp mode which would set a speed limit of, say, 20 mph so you could at least get it to a service garage without needing a tow or having to dig out the spare tire simply because you have a slow leak and the tire is, say, 10 PSI underinflated, or maybe the tires are just bald or maybe the sensor itself is malfunctioning and the tire is fine.  That'd be awfully irritating to be stranded with an immobilized car because the stupid sensor in the tire isn't working correctly.  TPMS sensors, for example, are notorious for flaking out and I don't see this being much different.  If it's an outright failure of the tire (Tire is completely flat, blown out, etc.), I would think that would be rather more obvious and that you'd stop because of it, whether your tire is equipped with the sensor or not.

Shelly
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Iron
Re: But there is no warning light
Shelly   6/10/2014 10:04:32 AM
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"The only way to get everyone into the act is to mandate the warning system in law (as in the csae of many safety related devices). I can see where this is heading."

 

Exactly; it will take an act of Congress.  Another way to punish the many (with higher auto prices, more gadgets to fail, etc), because a few can't be responsible enough to check their own tires.

 

I have a tough time believing the last statistic though; reduced efficiency of 0.3% due to <1 psi, and an average increase of 144 gallons/year?  I would believe those stats for <10 psi, but most tire pressure gages aren't even accurate down to 1 psi.  Either that, or the statistic was calculated for someone driving many more miles than I do daily (≈60 miles/day).

tekochip
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Platinum
Re: But there is no warning light
tekochip   6/10/2014 9:47:48 AM
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Yes, it will probably be as effective as the Check Engine light.


Battar
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Platinum
But there is no warning light
Battar   6/10/2014 9:22:05 AM
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There isn't a tire warning light on my dashboard. This technology is only effective if the car nabufacturers co-operate, and they won't do that unless they have a second source of compatible sensor fitted tyres. The only way to get everyone into the act is to mandate the warning system in law (as in the csae of many safety related devices). I can see where this is heading.

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