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15 Artistic Views of the Factory

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Charles Murray
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Re: Pop culture viewpoint
Charles Murray   6/13/2014 5:53:25 PM
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Having said all this, I have to admit that the best plant tour I ever got was at a steel mill in Gary, IN. Yes, it was dark and dreary (this was 1980), but it was awesome.

jlatorraca
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Iron
Re: fanciful images
jlatorraca   6/9/2014 1:37:06 AM
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If you get a chance to see the Grohmann Museum at Miliwaukee School of Engineering, they have an impressive art collection of the "Man at Work". Many factories, but also earlier.

http://www.msoe.edu/community/about-msoe/grohmann-museum/page/1311/grohmann-museum

from the web page description:

With more than 1,000 paintings and sculptures representing the evolution of human work, you're sure to identify with several pieces in the collection.

Debera Harward
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Silver
Re: fanciful images
Debera Harward   6/7/2014 8:21:20 AM
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Agreed with you Naperlou either the factories are very impressive or very blase I remember once in my childhood my school make me visited one of the candy factory and that factory was really very neat and clean it looked a if I have entered into a dream but the very next month when we visited one of the snack factory that factory has oil all around leaking from the machines and stuff so the condition of thefactory depends upon the product that is being manufactured on which scale the factory is operating as well. 

nicoleallenB
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Iron
factory
nicoleallenB   6/6/2014 3:29:17 AM
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That was really artistic. You can view how the people can work in the factory as well as see to it that they are also safe.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Pop culture viewpoint
Rob Spiegel   6/4/2014 8:26:36 PM
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Yes, that was a good post, Chuck. We'll see a less dreary view of factories depicted in film in an upcoming post. While some film factories are downright fun (Willy Wonka, Modern Times), even the dark ones are exciting (Terminator Salvation, Star Wars II Attack of the Clones).

Charles Murray
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Re: Pop culture viewpoint
Charles Murray   6/4/2014 8:14:21 PM
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Your use of the word "dreary" reminds me of a story we did last year: "Dark, Dirty and Dead-End? Manufacturers Say No." Unfortunately, though, that's the way the public today views factories.

http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1395&doc_id=267776

AJ2X
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Silver
Re: Steelmaking
AJ2X   6/4/2014 11:15:07 AM
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I love seeing these images of factories.  When I was growing up in the '50s and '60s, my dad was a public relations man for a factory that made steel kitchen cabinets, and then for a steel company.  Those lines of big machines cranking away purposefully in huge high-ceilinged buildings had a profound impression on me, and no doubt led me to becoming an engineer.

I found picture 12, by Martin Deschambault, to be the sort of muscular and heroic view of steelmaking that I remember from the brochures, magazines and even movies my dad helped create.  It IS interesting that there are no people in the picture, though.  Steelmaking will always bring to mind a movie scene of hard-hatted men throwing bags of material into a blast furnace, silouhetted against the bright glow of molten steel.

Me, I went into nice safe, clean and quiet electronics!

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Pop culture viewpoint
Rob Spiegel   6/3/2014 8:08:32 PM
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You're right about that, Cabe. Those cutaways had a run in the 1960s. This one tells a story of production from start to finish. You're right, there's no reason to do these in a world on CAD. However, they were great one-takes.

Cabe Atwell
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Re: Pop culture viewpoint
Cabe Atwell   6/3/2014 7:47:58 PM
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The level of detail that went into the first image is certainly impressive. Too bad they don't really do that anymore, it's all CAD-model mock-ups and virtual representations.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Pop culture viewpoint
Rob Spiegel   6/2/2014 8:16:06 PM
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You're right, Chuck. Dreary is the word. The next slideshow will feature factories depicted in the movies. Film has generally been kinder to factories. They tend to be funny (Lucy and thre chocolates, Willy Wonka, Modern Times) or futuristic (Star Wars Drone Factory, Terminator).

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