HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Blog

Home Health Devices Will Double by 2018

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Threaded|Newest First|Oldest First
GTOlover
User Rank
Platinum
Home medicine
GTOlover   5/15/2014 10:04:24 AM
NO RATINGS
"If you like your doctor, you can keep..." Well maybe not, but here take this machine home and we can monitor you.

Kidding aside, this should be good news for medical device manufacturers and that new tax that has to be paid for these devices. Higher sales and more tax money for the government to waste!

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Home medicine
Rob Spiegel   5/15/2014 10:43:08 AM
NO RATINGS
Thanks GTOlover. These developments could reduce health costs while improving care. As an example, a friend of mine contracted MRSA while in the hospital during a stay for an operation. Getting MRSA in the hospital is a common development. So they admitted him in his home, using home health devices to monitor him. They sent a nurse daily and a doctor every other day. He had the comfort (and infection free) benefit of being home. The healthcare staff was able to monitor him just as if he were in a room down the hall. Needless to say, the cost of his care was far lower than a hospital stay.

tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
Shorter Stay, Better Care
tekochip   5/15/2014 10:58:43 AM
NO RATINGS
A shorter hospital stay means better care.  Fortunately I only had to be admitted once, and I promise you I had better care and better rest with my wife watching me than in a noisy, busy hospital.


Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Shorter Stay, Better Care
Charles Murray   5/16/2014 11:23:19 AM
NO RATINGS
I definitely agree, tekochip. Hospitals are not a great place to get rest, and they can sometimes make you sicker. In the past five years, I've had two close, aging relatives die of "hospital pneumonia," which is apparently a well-known phenomenon. Both went into the hospital with an illness, contracted bacterial pneumonia during their stays, and passed away from the bacterial pneumonia. Don't get me wrong -- hospital care is vitally important, but it has its dangers.

far911
User Rank
Silver
Re: Shorter Stay, Better Care
far911   5/18/2014 8:32:43 AM
NO RATINGS
Charles to an extent you are right as being sick our immunity level is very low and are subject 2 attract 2 more diseases.

So hospitals are really not very safe.

Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Shorter Stay, Better Care
Cabe Atwell   5/20/2014 11:49:03 PM
NO RATINGS
I agree with the hospital stay sentiments and would rather stay home as well, even under the care of a medical robot. However, I don't think the 'Affordable Care Act' will have a clause for that.

bobjengr
User Rank
Platinum
HOME HEALTH CARE
bobjengr   5/17/2014 12:21:44 PM
NO RATINGS
So true--so true Rob.  Excellent post.  My wife and I are caring for our parents, 94 and 91 years of age and there are many times we wish we could "log in" to see their condition while we are away.  The connectivity that could be and possibly will be afforded a care-giver certainly would be a great convenience.  Hopefully work to develop these systems will continue and improve as the need becomes greater.  I also can certainly agree that depending upon the problem, a hospital is the worst place for recovery.  Both of our parents contracted colds and viruses during hospital visits after falling. Again, great post.  Very informative.

Greg M. Jung
User Rank
Platinum
Human Factor Design Home Health Care Devices
Greg M. Jung   5/24/2014 11:18:59 PM
NO RATINGS
I welcome the trend for more home health care devices.  However, one very big concern that needs to be addressed is incorporating proper human factors design into these home healthcare devices.  As home healtcare products become more and more feature-rich, the opportunity for a newly-trained user to mis-use the device at home becomes even greater (especially when the user-patient may be older and may become easily confused).  Thorough human factors and user failure mode analysis will especially be needed as these medical devices become more available in the home.

Partner Zone
More Blogs
During a teardown of the iPad Air and Microsoft Surface Pro 3 at the Medical Design & Manufacturing Show in Schaumburg, Ill., an engineer showed this "inflammatory" video about the dangers of maliciously mishandling lithium-ion batteries.
It's been two years since the Mac Mini's last appearance on iFixit's teardown table, but a newly revised version joins Apple's lineup this week.
Science fiction author Isaac Asimov may have the best rules for effective brainstorming and creativity. His never-before-published essay, "On Creativity," recently made it to the Web pages of MIT Technology Review.
Much has been made over the potentially dangerous flammability of lithium-ion batteries after major companies like Boeing, Sony, and Tesla have grappled with well-publicized battery fires. Researchers at Stanford University may have come up with a solution to this problem with a smart sensor for lithium-ion batteries that provides a warning if the battery is about to overheat or catch fire.
In this new Design News feature, "How it Works," we’re starting off by examining the inner workings of the electronic cigarette. While e-cigarettes seemed like a gimmick just two or three years ago, they’re catching fire -- so to speak. Sales topped $1 billion last year and are set to hit $10 billion by 2017. Cigarette companies are fighting back by buying up e-cigarette manufacturers.
Design News Webinar Series
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
9/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Nov 3 - 7, Engineering Principles behind Advanced User Interface Technologies
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 11:00 AM
Sponsored by Stratasys
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Gates Corporation
Next Class: 11/11-11/13 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Littelfuse
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service