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10 Epic Flaws in Product Design Revealed

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bobjengr
User Rank
Platinum
EPIC FLAWS
bobjengr   6/7/2014 5:27:27 PM
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You have truly hit the nail on the head with this one Elizabeth.  All of these "inventions" are problematic and some; downright annoying, a "pain in the drain".  It appears from the comments we all share similar experiences;  i.e. sensors in automatic sinks, bubble-wrap packaging covering ink cartridges and other hard-to-get-at components.   I owned a Pinto at one time so I know a little bit about that.  I'm sure there are others but this is an excellent start.  These inventions prove that hindsight is really 20-20. Good ideas at the time BUT!!!! Great post.               

CharlesM
User Rank
Silver
Apple connector and Tesla are wonderful designs
CharlesM   6/6/2014 10:07:48 AM
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I don't see any noteworthy design flaws, let alone epic ones, in either the Apple lightning connector or the Tesla.  Though some may have reliability problems with any connector, the lightning connector seems to me like a superb design and much improved over the 30-pin one it replaces. The criticism I understand is that they made accessories with the old plugs obsolete, which is not really true because you can buy adapters to the new connectors. There are old chargers which won't work with some of the newer devices, though. Also, some criticized the decision for a proprietary connector when an industry standard like a USB 3.0 might have worked just as well. A perception of a design flaw to the products, not the connector itself, may exist, however. The connector, I would disagree.

The Tesla doesn't belong at all on such a list. Where is its design flaw? Fears and potential flaws shouldn't count.

The Dyson is a failure due to its noise, IMO. That much noise should violate OSHA standards, if it doesn't already. The best solution is drip dry, my usual choice, or by using one half of one paper towel as shown in the TEDx talk here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2FMBSblpcrc

armorris
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Blame Marketing
armorris   6/5/2014 7:56:58 PM
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During the last 5 years of my career, I designed the electronics for soap and paper dispensers. I've used both IR and capacitive sensing. In the IR systems, I designed my own photodetector amplifier and created synchronous detection software to avoid interference and false triggering. All of my IR hand sensors were reflective, not transmissive (beam blocking) types and were battery-operated.

Colejd
User Rank
Iron
HDMI
Colejd   6/5/2014 1:02:19 PM
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What about the HDMI connector? No retention mechanism and zero-force insertion! Every time I move the cablebox in and out, I have to reach behind and plug it back in. This connector was not meant to be a high frequent plug. The 3/8 long metal part can barely hold up the heavy jacketed cable at the TV.

tdesmit
User Rank
Silver
Re: iPhone5 Cord
tdesmit   6/5/2014 12:03:34 PM
That's not the worst of it! We just bought a new IPOD Touch 5 for our daughter, and the charge cable failed on the second day of ownership. The problem? As with most of us these days, she doesn't like to unplug the cable from the power cube/USB jack, she just unplugs the IPOD. This leaves +5V USB power on the EXPOSED contacts of the cable, if (I should say "when", since it's going to happen eventually.) the end of the cable touches something conductive just right, it shorts the supply, and in this case vaporized and blackened the contact, rendering the cable useless.

I'm sure if you read Apple's instructions, they say to remove the USB end of the cable before disconnecting the IPOD, but I'd bet 9 out of 10 users don't. Developing a cable with exposed voltages is going backwards as far as I'm concerned. One more reason I'm not a fan of "the Apple Way" :(

Tom D.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: What did I miss?
Elizabeth M   5/22/2014 4:58:35 AM
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I'm not sure about this one, JimT, it could have been both! The Gremlin is still quite a cute car, isn't it? I'm sure there has to be at least one old man in Portugal where I live in the countryside driving around in one. ;) Actually, it's the Renault 4 that is big around here:

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: What did I miss
Elizabeth M   5/22/2014 4:56:48 AM
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Yes, I actually have friends that don't believe in vaccinations, JimT. I think it's a little bit misguided. I don't think kids should be overly doctored or vaccinated and allowed to develop some resistance themselves, but generally I think vaccinations against still existing and dangerous diseases should be done. (I myself have no kids at the moment, so it doesn't apply to me.) But I also do think resistance builds strength and it's nice when my friends who have kids aren't too overly germophobic and let the kids be a bit free in terms of that. I think it builds healthy immune systems.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
User Rank
Blogger
Re: What did I miss
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   5/21/2014 12:07:13 PM
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I know you're right.  Resistance builds strength.  It's the vaccination theory, in a way  ,,,, (although, vaccination has recently fallen under heavy scrutiny, being challenged by groups claiming it promotes autism) ,,, * sigh * ,,, God knows-?

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: What did I miss
Elizabeth M   5/21/2014 6:33:22 AM
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Ah, yes, people afraid of germs will do whatever they can to avoid touching anything others have touched, JimT. Sounds like those in charge of public toilets are adapting. I myself am a pretty healthy person and while I take the usual precautions with washing hands and the like, I am not so afraid to come in contact with foreign surfaces. I think personally this germophobe stuff has gone a bit too far and isn't allowing us to build the resistance we need to bacteria and viruses. This is one of the reasons for the development of superbugs like those found in hospitals. Some germs are good for us.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Pinto "Business" Flaw
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   5/20/2014 4:43:25 PM
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You move to the front row.  Kudos for calling it like it is.  Poor Management decisions more often than not.  Don't even get me started on my long list of those in my career.

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