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10 Cyber Attacks That Wreaked Havoc

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RogueMoon
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Re: the dangers of connectedness
RogueMoon   5/15/2014 9:21:41 AM
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right on, David. I couldn't agree more. 

Software quality control has become a thing of the past with the plethora of "patches" we're bombarded with every week.   Just put anything on the street and hope it sticks.

I don't think anyone outside of the big city techie communities participates in tech company focus groups (assuming they bother to poll a customer).  More and more, I get features in my cell phone that I didn't ask for.  On a few rare occassions, something useful is added.  More often, its more "chindogu" features to ignore, disable or simply force myself tolerate the annoyance. 

There's a whole industry dedicated to fixing things that aren't broken.

RogueMoon
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Re: the dangers of connectedness
RogueMoon   5/15/2014 9:16:38 AM
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Amen, naperlou!  One of the best security features today is disconnectedness.  In the military, they call it compartmentalization.  If someone has to spend more effort to bugger something, it makes it less likely to occur.

 

rick.curl
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Iron
Not just a terrestrial problem
rick.curl   5/15/2014 9:05:19 AM
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Slide 6 makes mention of NASA having to block email attachments before Shuttle launches to avoid virus attacks, but it would appear that the International Space Station has already been hit by cyber attacks on more than one occasion: 

http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2013/nov/12/international-space-station-virus-epidemics-malware

Pretty scary stuff!

David Cox
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Gold
Re: the dangers of connectedness
David Cox   5/15/2014 8:35:50 AM
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In my opinion it is all a matter of novelty (and a bit of laziness).  Do I really need to be able to stream my cable signal to every device in my house and control it from my cell phone?  What's wrong with the cable remote sitting next to me?  Do I really need to be able to shut off my lights at home from the beach?  Do I need a garment embedded with leds that flashes when I am in proximity of a potential mate?  I answer a resounding NO.  If service providers said "You need to be able to do this." and we, the users said, "No, we don't," then maybe they wouldn't be so damn invasive (and by extension, we wouldn't have everything we own controlled through the internet).

lynnbr2
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Iron
Re: the dangers of connectedness
lynnbr2   5/15/2014 8:32:21 AM
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Actually, there is currently a great push to connect former "islands of automation" to "network operating centers' in order to perform condition monitoring. Online bearing and gear condition analysis is now offered by SKF, as just one example. The recent Malaysian plane mystery had "pingers" in the Rolls Royce engines that effectively tracked power-on-hours for the vendor of the turbines. Most of theses new services ignore the security aspect of connecting all of these machines via the cloud - IMHO.

Charles Murray
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Re: the dangers of connectedness
Charles Murray   5/14/2014 8:29:02 PM
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That's a great question, naperlou. It seems like full connectivity has become such an accepted practice of business that many entities (corporations, goverment and utilities) don't bother to ask how important it really is.

William K.
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Re: the dangers of connectedness
William K.   5/14/2014 4:38:14 PM
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Naperlou, not only the question of is it worth being connected, but also the question of teh value of being compatible. Infections can happen to non-connected networks by means of infected portable data devices. But those non-PC compatible PLC devices would be a bit more challenging to hack, by virtue of not speaking the same language at all. But as soon as a system has parts that can handle the files, hacking becomes possible.

One working solution would be hardware firewalls of the type that would only allow certain commands, such as requests for data, to pass through, with no availability of an option to change that by means of software. Of course, the tradeoff is a lack of flexibility, and needing to change proms in order to change the programming. BUt the benefit would be a hacker-proof wall. The makers of proms and E-Proms would love it, though.

The actual mechanization would be that the instruction from outside would be of the type "send message #1 from the stored messages list, with that list being coded into the hardware memory, not changable from the outside. Sort of like a jukebox- select a record to play was the only option. And it could only play the records installed inside.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: the dangers of connectedness
Rob Spiegel   5/14/2014 1:08:03 PM
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That's a great question, Naperlou. For decades, plants were networked without connectivity to the outside. This didn't change with the internet of things. It changed with connectivity to the ERP system -- folks in the front office wanted to know when an order was completed and shipped so they could invoice it ASAP. And sales folks wanted to know what was going on. That ERP was connected to the internet, which meant the plant was then connected de facto.

naperlou
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the dangers of connectedness
naperlou   5/14/2014 12:48:53 PM
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Rob, we have to ask ourselves a question about whether it is worth the risk to be so fully connected.  There is very little utility to having an industrial or utility control system connected to the Internet.  It is possible, and desirable, to have strong seperation of networks.  I observed issues with this many years before the Internet came live in a situation where we had corporate networks with vendor protocols. 

Rob Spiegel
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Blogger
Re: Lessons of history
Rob Spiegel   5/14/2014 11:03:15 AM
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Good point Tekochip. Yes, Stuxnet was very sophisticated. Stuxnet has three modules: a worm that executes all routines related to the main payload of the attack; a link file that automatically executes the propagated copies of the worm; and a rootkit component responsible for hiding all malicious files and processes, preventing detection of the presence of Stuxnet.


So as it was destroying the centrifuges, the monitors said everything was going just fine.

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