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Video: Glass-Paved Roads Provide Solar Power

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Trenth
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Gold
Re: Vision
Trenth   5/5/2014 8:11:52 PM
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Not even close, even on historical breaks per KWH.  And it's total that give an industry power, not per KWH.  Why are the fossils and nuclear getting ANY?  

http://cleantechnica.com/2012/08/03/oil-gas-over-13-times-more-in-historical-subsidies-than-clean-energy/





 

White elephant because we were propping up and are propping up fossils and nuclear, making them artificially seem cheaper.  

 

I got friend argument?  really?  Anecodotal mean anything to you?  

 

There would be no nuclear and no fracking without tax dollars.  

 

People used to get tans too, so I guess solar isn't new.  Try again.  

 

COmparing modern 2% per Wp 30 year solar pv to 70's solar heating,  really?  

Ralphy Boy
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Vision
Ralphy Boy   5/5/2014 6:59:34 AM
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"But the requirment it be done without taxpaer invetment is not fair.  Fracking was invented on the taxpaers dime, and fossils and nuclear have gotten massive gov breaks and subsidies.  Now new energy is supposed to compete without help?"

What, solar hasn't already been? And it's not new tech either.

I won't go into the whole story again; it's on this forum somewhere already, but...

In the 70s & 80s I worked at a place that was a NASA grant funded solar heated/cooled factory. We had about 1/2 an acre of water filled collectors (you don't hear much about those anymore do you?)

I have a copy of the final report that the owner/designer/NASA Grantee put together after 2 years of the system being on line. The report claims success.

The system was called a "White Elephant" by the multi-national that bought the company a year or 2 after they bought it.. They read the report pre-purchase and believed it no doubt (NASA Approved too!) A few years later it was shut down.

I helped remove the system. Those of us who knew a decent chunk of what happened know it was a case of waste/over billing/and gambling on a tech by the boss and his friends. $12,000,000 down the drain on a dead-end tech.

But the old man never stopped smiling.

Far too many government grant dollars are wasted pursuing ideas that almost no one would spend their own money on.

I stand by the simple make-or-break test that I proposed... Or do a 100' of parking lot lane with the same tax-break but no grants.

And the price-per-watt rule will likely apply for many years to come. THAT is what should be the prim focus of solar, not weird gimmicks that have dozens of easily pointed out flaws and weaknesses.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Interesting concept that fails the reality check
Elizabeth M   5/5/2014 3:30:56 AM
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Another good idea, William K. Having the panels free to absorb solar and without the stress of vehicles driving over them would probably be more efficient in the long run and certainly cut down on maintenance costs.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Vision
Elizabeth M   5/5/2014 3:25:08 AM
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You make good points, vandamme. I think the panels will have protection against the elements but even so, perhaps they would best work in places that don't have such severe weather. The roof idea is interesting but would probably get a bit costly, and imagine all that construction on busy roads. (I'm thinking of the nightmare of the Big Dig in Boston.) But not a bad idea at all.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Vision
Elizabeth M   5/5/2014 3:23:23 AM
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You're probably right, jhankwitz, about the cost, but I think the idea is that eventually they would pay for themselves in electricity. Yes I think it's a tough sell, but the DoT is interested already, and I think that is half the battle. They could start doing this with some new roads and parking lots and see how it works before retrofitting, which would cost a lot more money, as you point out.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Interesting concept that fails the reality check
William K.   5/1/2014 10:09:24 PM
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Building the photocells into a roadway surface is quite a concept, but all of the negatives pointed out so far are right on target. The treatment of a roadway is far to brutal for it to last very long, and if it were made tough enough to last it would indeed wear to a smooth surface in a while.

BUT the same material could be placed on the ground along the highways and not only absorb more energy, but also eliminate that task of mowing that costs quite a bit. And putting it off the roadway the only normal traffic on the photocells would be occasional animals and pedestrians. That would be the first unanticipated benefit. Much simpler maintenance and having power just where it is needed would be additioinal benefits. The downside is that it would be subject to damage from vehicles leaving the roadway in collisions or other loss of control instances.

Trenth
User Rank
Gold
Re: Vision
Trenth   5/1/2014 4:15:04 PM
NO RATINGS
The heavy trucks will destroy the panels, agreed.  

 

I do see a possible use in parking lot lanes since they are empty most of the time, no large trucks, and low speeds.   Overhead would probably be cheaper and better.  

 

But the requirment it be done without taxpaer invetment is not fair.  Fracking was invented on the taxpaers dime, and fossils and nuclear have gotten massive gov breaks and subsidies.  Now new energy is supposed to compete without help?  

Ralphy Boy
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Vision
Ralphy Boy   5/1/2014 12:38:18 PM
NO RATINGS
Sorry Elizabeth, I'm not impressed by a DoT interest. Solyndra... went bankrupt after receiving $535 million in taxpayer guaranteed loans. Why? Because the solar collector biz is a 'price per watt' market place.

Fancy gimmicks that cost many times the price of a flat panel are much like expensive art. BTW, I've almost been tossed from a gallery or two for laughing too loud at some ridiculously childish great masterpieces.

Here's the simple test for this idea. Install one 100' section on a city bypass that is being re-graded... Record every penny spent doing so. Record the electricity produced, the maintenance costs... the accident rate, especially the rear-enders that happen in the rain after a few years of gritty tires polishing the glass... etc. And do all this with no taxpayer funds other than some decent tax-breaks on the private capital invested.  

If after 5 years the data looks good when compared to the rest of the re-graded roadway... Yell BINGO and go for broke. Otherwise... gimmick.  

DVanditmars
User Rank
Silver
A shaded vision?
DVanditmars   5/1/2014 12:16:18 PM
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So how much solar energy are you going to get from a full parking lot?  Vehicles will be parked on top of the solar cells, so no sunlight will be available for energy conversion...

Sort of the same problem with roads, especially during traffic congestion and/or during rush-hour.

 

vandamme
User Rank
Silver
Re: Vision
vandamme   5/1/2014 9:14:23 AM
They're welcome to try this in Central NY to see if it lasts over a winter without the rain, salt, and snow destroying the electronics or corroding the connections, or snow plows chewing them up. Is glass more slippery than asphalt?


Why not just cover the road with a roof? Put the solar panel on that. No more salt, snow, slush. The roadway would last much longer, glare would be reduced. Put a slope on it so snow slides off (no heating elements). Cooler in the summer.

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