HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Blog

3D-Printed Smart Membrane Detects Heart Problems

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Threaded|Newest First|Oldest First
Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
More heart technology innovation
Elizabeth M   3/19/2014 7:19:46 AM
NO RATINGS
This is an interesting follow-up to another story I wrote about heart-valve technology that flexes like a real heart valve: http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1386&doc_id=272112

There is a lot of new innovation happening in the area of artificial heart technology and other technology to help people with heart problems, as well as technology to improve other artificial limbs. This one especially is really interesting, because it marks a possible breakthrough in treatment for people with chronic heart problems. I'd be curious to see what those in the medical field think about this.

Debera Harward
User Rank
Silver
Re: More heart technology innovation
Debera Harward   3/19/2014 2:05:49 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks Elizebeth for such an interesting post  , No doubt 3d technology is being used for a number of good and life saving purposes . I was just aware that this technology is being used in medical in terms of transpants of the organs and dentistry but ths smart membrane is really very innovative method of detecting heart problems.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: More heart technology innovation
Elizabeth M   3/20/2014 8:11:05 AM
NO RATINGS
You're welcome, Debera. I didn't know this technology was used for other applications, so it's good to know that now. And yes, the heart application is really fascinating and could do a lot to help people with chronic heart conditions in terms of quality of life, I think.

etmax
User Rank
Gold
Re: More heart technology innovation
etmax   3/29/2014 9:52:57 AM
NO RATINGS
This is a brilliant post, thanks. It has a whole range of uses, effectively giving a Dr a 24hr echocardiogram as well as an electrocardiogram.

 

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: More heart technology innovation
Elizabeth M   3/31/2014 5:11:57 AM
NO RATINGS
Thank you, etmax. I agree that it has the potential to be an extremely useful tool for doctors and people with heart disease.

a2
User Rank
Gold
Re: More heart technology innovation
a2   3/31/2014 5:25:08 AM
NO RATINGS

@Elizabath: Yes indeed but what about the security aspects of this system ? Does it have any risks towards the records of the patients ?

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: More heart technology innovation
Elizabeth M   4/2/2014 5:33:36 AM
NO RATINGS
That is a very interesting question, a2. I suppose when any information is sent wirelessly there are security issues, but I can't imagine they would not be addressed before these devices were used on patients. But these are good questions to be asking before the technology comes out of the lab.

Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: More heart technology innovation
Cabe Atwell   5/24/2014 1:38:48 AM
NO RATINGS
The medical uses for the membrane are certainly remarkable. I assume the information collected would be sent over a Wi-Fi connection for doctors to review. So my question is, wouldn't that make it vulnerable to being hacked? I say this because heart defibrillators and pacemakers can be hacked to overvolt or dump their medicine, which would be detrimental to the patient.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: More heart technology innovation
Elizabeth M   5/29/2014 3:44:40 AM
NO RATINGS
Good question, Cabe. I think the connection would probably be secured somehow to avoid such scenarios, but in truth I don't really know. Something for me to follow up on with the researchers. Thanks for asking!

bobjengr
User Rank
Platinum
3-D SMART MEMBRANE
bobjengr   3/20/2014 5:28:57 PM
NO RATINGS
Excellent post Elizabeth.  Several years ago my father, age 84 at that time, underwent emergency surgery for a heart valve replacement.   He was a candidate due to his overall physical condition.  Today he is 91 and probably has a stronger heart than I.  Medical engineering and medical technology absolutely amaze me and the application of 3-D printing to these fascinating fields indicates what a marvelous place and future "addititive" manufacturing has.  I really appreciate the information and had no idea engineers and doctors were working towards this type of preventative medicine. 

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: 3-D SMART MEMBRANE
Elizabeth M   3/24/2014 4:32:40 AM
NO RATINGS
Thanks, bobjengr, for your comment and the great story about your dad. I'm so glad to hear things went well and he remains so healthy. Some of these innovations are truly amazing and it's for operations like the one he had that this research is so beneficial. And as you mention, to prevent problems before operations like heart-valve replacements are necessary can lead to an even greater good.

Greg M. Jung
User Rank
Platinum
Other Applications
Greg M. Jung   3/21/2014 5:41:18 PM
NO RATINGS
In addition to applications in the heart area, perhaps other areas of the body could also benefit from this electrical technology.  Maybe patients who suffer from certain conditions in the brain (such as epilepsy) could also use the monitoring and sensing provided by this development in the future. 

Debera Harward
User Rank
Silver
Re: Other Applications
Debera Harward   3/23/2014 4:33:13 AM
NO RATINGS
Yes Greg, This is really a vast field and its just the begining . This technology will surely bring wonders in medical sciences and it will be a lot help to the patients who are suffering with chronic diseases .

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Other Applications
Elizabeth M   3/24/2014 4:07:14 AM
NO RATINGS
That is a good idea, Greg. I am sure there would be some other considerations to the technology when dealing with the delicate conditions of the brain, but I am sure it could be modified to this area of the body. I just wrote about technology to help people with migraines that is used externally to stimulate a key cranial nerve (stay tuned--the story hasn't posted online yet) so maybe something like that could be modified for internal use for epilepsy or other disorders.

AnandY
User Rank
Gold
Re : 3D-Printed Smart Membrane Detects Heart Problems
AnandY   3/25/2014 5:23:07 AM
NO RATINGS
@ bobjengr, good to know your father weathered that valve replacement surgery and has stronger heart now. It seems good to have some heart problem and come out with stronger heart. On a serious note, application of 3-D printing to medical engineering is bearing fruit which is good and has great prospects in future.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Re : 3D-Printed Smart Membrane Detects Heart Problems
Elizabeth M   3/25/2014 5:28:56 AM
NO RATINGS
Actually, bobjengr, you bring up a good point that I raised in a story I wrote awhile back on the Bionic Man: http://www.designnews.com/document.asp?doc_id=270180


There is an idea in the medical field that human replacement parts (prosthetics and other artificial parts) are not just making humans equal to the strength they had before the replacement, but actually stronger. So your dad would be a case in point--his heart may be even stronger now not only than his diseased heart, but even the heart he originally had from birth. So then there becomes an ethical question in medicine, whether it's OK to start making people not just whole again human-wise, but even super human.

I think it's quite an interesting debate, but personally think a lot of what medicine is doing in this respect is amazing.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Re : 3D-Printed Smart Membrane Detects Heart Problems
Elizabeth M   3/26/2014 4:24:49 AM
NO RATINGS
I juat realized that it was AandY that brough up the point about the heart being stronger, not bobjengr, although it was his story that inspired it. (See my previous comment.) It doesn't matter who said it, really, but the point itself is valid.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Interesting concept, but not a simple installation?
William K.   3/26/2014 3:21:47 PM
NO RATINGS
Great post, Elizabeth, and a lot of good comments already. But I see a point not mentioned, or at least not that I noticed any mention, which is about getting the thing into place. Surgery to expose the heart is a very big deal action, no matter what the benefits would be. So is there some wonderful laproscopic process for placing the stretchable monitor? If there is, I certainly missed it. 

But it certainly is an invention that has a lot of benefits to offer.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Interesting concept, but not a simple installation?
Elizabeth M   3/27/2014 7:39:06 AM
NO RATINGS
I don't know about the process, William K., I would have to look into it further. Yes, the operation certainly would be risky, as all surgeries are, especially when the heart is exposed. I imagine this type of thing would only be used in patients that really needed constant monitoring and for whom it would be more beneficial to have potentially dangerous surgery than not. Or perhaps there is a low-invasive way to insert the membrane. I will try to do some digging and get back to you.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Interesting concept, but not a simple installation?
William K.   3/27/2014 10:00:38 AM
NO RATINGS
The other question is about connections, which none are visible in the photo. It certainly is an interesting concept, and more details about the actual printing process would be both educational and potentially useful. The point about this being a stretchy design makes it quite unique indeed. Most designs are ridgid, typically, or a bit flexible at best. So flexible and stretchable is something quite new.

AnandY
User Rank
Gold
Re : 3D-Printed Smart Membrane Detects Heart Problems
AnandY   3/27/2014 7:00:47 AM
NO RATINGS
What is more interesting to me is that it opens new horizons for 3-D technology in the medical field. Several questions like cancerous cells are unanswered still and I wonder if medical engineering and technology using 3-D could help in those cases as well. 3-D has done a lot on the diagnosis side so far.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Re : 3D-Printed Smart Membrane Detects Heart Problems
Elizabeth M   3/27/2014 7:34:05 AM
NO RATINGS
That's really interesting, AandY, how do you think 3D printing may help cancer cells? I guess if doctors could somehow fabricate healthy cells via 3D printing and replace cancerous ones with them, that could be one way. Of course, I am no doctor or medical expert in any way, so that sounds way too simple to actually be possible, I guess! But you're right in that 3D printing opens up a lot of doors fo the medical field.

Debera Harward
User Rank
Silver
Re: Re : 3D-Printed Smart Membrane Detects Heart Problems
Debera Harward   3/30/2014 3:32:46 PM
NO RATINGS
Elizebeth, in terms of cancerous cells we can say that as kemitherapy is the solution for cancer but it is very hazardous as well so i guess 3D technology should do something or introduce any technology which act as a replacement of kemotherapy to reduce the side effects .

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Re : 3D-Printed Smart Membrane Detects Heart Problems
Elizabeth M   3/31/2014 5:53:00 AM
NO RATINGS
Thanks for that information, Debera. I do not know much about this but I imagine if the heart treatment is successful that perhaps other uses will be investigated, including one for cancer.

Partner Zone
More Blogs
Take a look through these film and TV robots from 1990 through 1994.
The Soofa is an urban smart bench that provides mobile device charging as well as collects environmental information via wireless sensors.
MIT’s Senseable City Lab recently announced the program’s next big project: “Local Warming.” The concept involves saving on energy by heating the occupants within a room, not the room itself.
The fun factor continues to draw developers to Linux. This open-source system continues to succeed in the market and in the hearts and minds of developers. Design News will delve into this territory with next week's Continuing Education Class titled, “Introduction to Linux Device Drivers.”
The new draw-it-on-a-napkin is the CAD program. As CAD programs become more ubiquitous and easier to use, they have replaced 2D sketching for early concepting.
Design News Webinar Series
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
5/13/2014 10:00 a.m. California / 1:00 p.m. New York / 6:00 p.m. London
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Aug 4 - 8, Introduction to Linux Device Drivers
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: August 12 - 14
Sponsored by igus
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service