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Video: Arduino & Raspberry Pi Drink-Mixing Robot

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janetwillson213
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Iron
Re: Cool party favor
janetwillson213   4/15/2014 3:37:31 AM
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Thanks Cabe, I like your video and Project Goldie, it is so nice. But I can't find your cartoons. Can you please tell me where is this actually? You may also check here regarding this.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Nice machine
Rob Spiegel   2/4/2014 11:36:19 AM
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Yeah, Nadine, I've seen automated coffee bars in live theater lobbies. Though I haven't seen it, apparently tablet-servers are showing up at restaurants.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Cool party favor
Elizabeth M   2/4/2014 4:40:06 AM
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Wow, impressive, Chuck! I feel humbled in the presence of such talented folks, coming more from a journalist/writer side of things than the engineering side. I do have a fascination with technology and innovation, though, so I suppose that helps. Even if I can't do it, I can at least admire it and write about it. I think if other staff members are developing cool things, they should speak up and write about it!

Charles Murray
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Blogger
Re: Cool party favor
Charles Murray   2/3/2014 6:26:54 PM
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We've had some pretty amazing people on the staff over the years, Liz. Jon Titus, who  retired from Design News only a few months ago, is actually credited with building one of the first PCs, the Mark-8 in 1974, which appeared on the cover of Radio Electronics (unfortunately not on the cover of Design News). It's now on display at the Smithsonian Intitution in Washington D.C., which gives an idea of its monumental significance. That said, I don't remember any of our staff editors writing an article in DN about their own invention. To my knowledge, Cabe is the first.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RcgeWmh8ym8

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Cool party favor
Elizabeth M   2/3/2014 7:20:46 AM
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I was wondering about that, Chuck. I haven't been around Design News that long but I was also wondering if it was common for an editor to also be an inventor and write about his/her own work. I think it's really interesting and cool, but personally I can only write about engineering, not actually invent anything or do anything too technical! So this makes me extra impressed about what Cabe has done. But perhaps we should do more of this if there are equally inventive people on the writing staff.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: An obvious reason that you didn't mention.
William K.   2/1/2014 3:46:40 PM
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78R, You propose an interesting alternative. But the problem of stepper motors slipping steps happens much more at higher speeds, rather than at starts, as long as the load is within the ability of the motor. So the control could be quite simple, just to add the additional torque whenever the velocity command exceeded some value. No need for a high level of control there. And another option would be to raise the stepper motor voltage when the speed command went above some setpoint. That would be a lot simppler mechanically and probably only require adding either a single relay or a switching transistor. And the voltage controller could be driven by the velocity command amplitude, so there would be no extra computer control functions involved. That is about as simple as I can think of.

78RPM
User Rank
Gold
Re: An obvious reason that you didn't mention.
78RPM   2/1/2014 10:43:53 AM
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Excellent comments, William K. Cabe does walk the walk and talk the talk of a design engineer.

Building on your idea of torque assist for the servo: Adding a brush-type DC motor would make the State Machine more complex and would likely require multitasking to control two types of motors and monitor position, suggesting an RTOS.  Thus, the Raspberry Pi would take on this burden, not the Arduino.  What do you think about providing torque assist via a latch solenoid engaging a twist spring just before activating a servo?  There could be one spring for forward assist and another for reverse assist.  The torque would be just enough to supplement the servo's effort. This might be a simpler approach, though I haven't thought through how to rewind the spring.

78RPM
User Rank
Gold
Re: Nice machine
78RPM   2/1/2014 9:08:11 AM
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I stand duly corrected.

a.saji
User Rank
Silver
Re: Drinkmotizer
a.saji   1/31/2014 9:29:18 PM
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 @taimoor: Yes something new and refreshing thing for the market.

NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Nice machine
NadineJ   1/31/2014 6:27:01 PM
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"impress the chicks?"

You shouldn't give alcohol to chickens...especially babies.

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