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My Opinion on Cloud Computing: It Takes You Back to the Future

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Andrewboon
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Iron
Cloud Computing and Security
Andrewboon   12/26/2013 7:44:34 AM
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Most organizations move to cloud technology - it is cost effective and offers numerous other benefits such as ubiquitous access, however organizations should also be wary of the security risks of moving to the cloud, I work for McGladrey and there's a whitepaper on cloud computing that will interest a few readers it weighs the risks of moving to the cloud against the many benefits of the cloud. @ "Cloud risks striking a balance between savings and security"   http://bit.ly/16uLsgi

dgreig
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Bronze
Security and the "cloUd"
dgreig   12/26/2013 1:20:23 PM
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I shall not "cloud".

Security and integrity are paramount to my life.

Linux MultiLevelSecurity and SELINUX/IPTABLES/Clamav.

Scientific Linux or even Centos.

NadineJ
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Platinum
Re: Security and the "cloUd"
NadineJ   12/26/2013 5:35:19 PM
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"I shall not cloud"

I felt the same way until my itunes updated.  I'm in the cloud whether I choose it or not.

dgreig
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Bronze
Re: Security and the "cloUd"
dgreig   12/26/2013 6:42:06 PM
What on earth are/is "itunes". I taught(Tweety Pi) to verse it that way.

Me - telephone, make and receive calls and answer machine is usefull.

Mobile ought with less than a 17" screen and Hz1920 pixels is a waste of time and space.

Perhaps I am opinionated!

 

Pubudu
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Platinum
Re: Security and the "cloUd"
Pubudu   12/27/2013 1:59:35 PM
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dgreig, I believe that now the cloud servicers are much secure and very cost effective from the organizational point of view. I may say that it is much secured than the in hand data cause that there is many possibility of oozing the data which is in hand than the cloud. 

dgreig
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Bronze
Re: Security and the "cloUd"
dgreig   12/27/2013 4:31:32 PM
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What to do if the net goes down (or your ISP)?

Who owns your data, read the small print, even gmail has ownership of your data? This is very important detail

For an example of me and VCS, I use Linus Torvalds et all GIT. Distributed.

As for US patents, for an outsider they offer no protection, the small print is along the lines of for the protection, security and benefit of the USA people. I am not a US citizen therefore filing a US patent would be lowering protection.

I recommend Linux SW raid, a couple of spare enterprise discs and basic partitions with EXT4 for the important underlying FS. WD, Fujitsu or Hitachi (not Seagate/Maxtor!).

There again I do not use mobile anything other than Laptops with 17" or 18.3" displays, no WiFi or Bluepoo.

NadineJ
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Platinum
embrace or evolve
NadineJ   12/26/2013 5:31:50 PM
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I agree that cloud computing is here to stay.  Like most have already said, the security issues need to be addressed in a straight forward and simple way.  Complicated fixes don't work.

Limited natural resources demand an evolution.  Where's the power for the cloud coming from in the future? 

TJ McDermott
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Blogger
Hidden cost
TJ McDermott   12/26/2013 9:47:07 PM
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No where does any article about cloud computing discuss the cost of the internet connection.  More and more cloud computing means larger and larger pipelines to feed the need.  Data limits are common for mobile users and for home users.  Increasing those limits can get costly very quickly.

NadineJ
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Platinum
Re: Hidden cost
NadineJ   12/27/2013 1:37:56 PM
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That's a good point.  The cost to consumers is widening the chasm between rich and poor, especially within rich countries such as the U.S.

In order to succeed, financially, people need to be connected.  When so many have to choose between paying for food and housing month to month, connectivity is a dream.

Pubudu
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Re: Hidden cost
Pubudu   12/27/2013 2:03:46 PM
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TJ most of the tie cloud is use for the backups so that there may be a limited access to the data. Any way I believe that still cloud is cost effective with the increase in data transfer costs, compared with the traditional data storage system which has more maintenance and physical recourses. 

LetoAtreidesII
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Platinum
The cloud has a place,but with caution
LetoAtreidesII   12/27/2013 9:12:16 AM
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Ah this story bring back memmorys of our old VAX computer network.

Now my comment their is a definite place for the cloud but users looking to switch must be warey not only of the often mentioned security issue.

- Small companies atleast the 3 I have worked for and the 1 I own often have such limited bandwidth that we need to group up to watch webinars just so we do not hog the entire net bandwidth.  Those in a large corporate structure may not have this problem but under 100 person companies definitely do.

- Mobility, I am an engineer but service in the field is part of this task that is why the laptop has always been either my only PC or a strong portion of my PC power.  No Cloud will replace this as when servicing equipment in some dark hole of a plant you never know what you will have for connection, normally nothing.

- Uptime, Again may be a small co. thing but until the internet is fast and without glitch i find it best to work local.  I do not even work of networks storage as to often it is running slow or down.  Run local and have a backup script run each night again the best of both worlds.

Well their is my 50 cents, inflation you know.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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Blogger
Re: The cloud has a place,but with caution
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   12/31/2013 12:17:55 AM
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Remember VAX-?  I started on a Digital Equipment DEC system 10 – a Mainframe.  Single Point Storage.  Funny  -the more things change, the more they stay the same.  See my post below on the various "feel" of the decades, 1970 thru 2010.

bobjengr
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Platinum
BACK TO THE FUTURE
bobjengr   12/27/2013 12:15:51 PM
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Excellent post.  My BIG issue is one mentioned by several comments already--security.  Each year we lose millions, maybe billions, of dollars as a result of theft by a variety of entities, commercial, industrial, political etc etc. China has and is stealing billions from US companies due to loss of intellectual property.  NSA is in the act, not because of terrorism but because they CAN--simply put.  The cloud would be a marvelous convenience for most honest companies doing business in an honest manner.  We don't live in that world.   

taimoortariq
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Gold
Re: BACK TO THE FUTURE
taimoortariq   12/28/2013 1:24:47 AM
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I totally agree on this one. Cloud computation can give rise to huge security issues. Perhaps, restricting cloud computation to lesser confidential applications would be a wiser adaptation to this technology!

notarboca
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Gold
Re: BACK TO THE FUTURE
notarboca   12/28/2013 6:54:40 PM
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taimoortariq, I agree. I would keep IP, company secrets, inventions,etc. on a server with traditional access.  The rest of the applications would be fine running in the cloud.

taimoortariq
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Gold
Re: BACK TO THE FUTURE
taimoortariq   12/28/2013 7:15:06 PM
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Yes, Thats exactly how it should be. There is way too much security risk otherwise.

Pubudu
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Platinum
Re: BACK TO THE FUTURE
Pubudu   12/30/2013 11:07:16 PM
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notarboca, that will be a great idea and it has much security for the important data. 

William K.
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Platinum
Your program is no faster than your connection
William K.   12/27/2013 10:32:50 PM
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I once contracted at a large company that had their incredibly expensive CAD system on a server and each of us users had ourown computer connected via the network. So when we used the cad program portions somehow arrived on our computers, and we used the cad program. BUT all of our work was saved on the mainframe, or whatever that beast was. It had to be huge to hold all of those files and that huge program with it's huge collections of libraries. A whole lot like the cloud, but not "distributed", and when the computer holding the program was down about 500 workstations were not able to do CAD. That was indeed a bit of a financial drag, I am sure.

My point is that unless the connection is fast enough, which may be the case in some design office area of a rich organization, there does seem to be a slowness that happens when a bunch of folks watch some TV or movie, which happened at another company that had all of the programs on the server. Of course nobody was allowed to watch TV or movies, but it was quite obvious when it was happening. Can cloud computing function adequately without lightning speed internet connections? I don't believe that it can. And in a lot of plantsthere is NO INTERNET at any speed available, and even an extension cord or an outlet to plug into is hard to find. All of my service information is always either on the notebooks hard drive or on CDs or floppies. "Never show up without being prepared to do the job" is a very good mantra for anybody who is intending to do service for a profit. Remember that clouds can be quite spotty at times.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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Blogger
Re: Your program is no faster than your connection
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   12/30/2013 11:04:18 PM
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1970's – Mainframe computers and 'input' terminals.  Data resides on main frame. Single Point location storage.

1980's – Introduction of PC's – data resides on PC's – millions of individual locations.  "Back-up"  is invented; strongly recommended.

1990's – FileShare/AppleShare/Internet   ---  the beginnings of connectivity.  Confusion reigns. Where is the data-? Not sure, but lets invest in a dot-com ,,,,

2000's – Internet, Networks, Apps  &  individual computing systems simultaneously mature.  Cooperative growth  yields a synergistic information  matrix. The Information Super Highway.

2010's – Internet based storage and Fileshare systems become pervasive, as  "The Cloud" – Single point location storage.  (see 1970's )

What goes around, comes around again -- eventually.

 

Pubudu
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Platinum
Re: Your program is no faster than your connection
Pubudu   12/30/2013 11:14:13 PM
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Jim T its seems to be that we all are hanging around the same with the different technology thanks for sharing. 

DB_Wilson
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Gold
Re: Your program is no faster than your connection
DB_Wilson   1/2/2014 9:35:16 AM
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Did the "Thin Client" come along sometime in the '90s? 

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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Re: Your program is no faster than your connection
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   1/15/2014 4:44:52 PM
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Honestly, I never really 'got' the thin client.  I was in a development group at a large Electronics company, and we developed high encryption phones, laptops and thin-client devices.  To this day, I often wondered why anyone would purchase one; it seemed to be no more than a "dumb" terminal, like a throwback from the remote terminals of the 1970's. I think it was a Marketing concept.  And once one company gets an idea to market - smart or not, other companies follow suit.

taimoortariq
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Gold
cloud computing
taimoortariq   12/28/2013 1:15:12 AM
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If we manage to balance local computation and cloud conputation along with high Connectivity, then we can certainly save huge costs on our personal computers for future high computational applications.

Pubudu
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Re: cloud computing
Pubudu   12/30/2013 10:04:40 PM
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You are right taimoortariq, cloud computing will save lot of money by reducing the maintenance cost and the initial investment for the machines. But I believe that real gain can be taken from the organization by doing this large scale than the personal computing.

taimoortariq
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Gold
Re: cloud computing
taimoortariq   12/31/2013 12:02:27 AM
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You are right about that, but if it becomes a trend on a personal level, than it will certainly be adopted by large scale organizations as well.

a.saji
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Silver
Re: cloud computing
a.saji   12/31/2013 10:21:41 AM
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@taimoor: Yes and I feel it has captured the eyes of many big firms. A good sign indeed.            

Pubudu
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Platinum
Re: cloud computing
Pubudu   12/31/2013 11:37:52 PM
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True a.saji cloud and the BYOD is the future for sure. 

AnandY
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Re: back to the future
AnandY   12/30/2013 7:52:14 AM
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Funny I never thought of it in that light. The similarities are quite striking when viewed in this respect. Even so, I think the cloud computing would never have been feasible without the availability of powerful PCs with ultra fast processors. If you doubt that then try accessing cloud storage from a Pentium III processor and see the difference.

AnandY
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Re: Great flashback
AnandY   12/30/2013 8:14:13 AM
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Looking back after reading this piece, I can't help but feel that you left out one very important development that took place somewhere along the cycle of evolution you outlined; the dawn of Windows 95. Now that really defined computing at the time and it was very affordable back then too. I believe it's played a very important role in developing the modern computer.

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