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Slideshow: Packaging Robots Become Superhuman

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bobjengr
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PACKAGING AND ROBOTIC SYSTEMS
bobjengr   9/14/2014 11:16:04 AM
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Rob, you slide show brought back memories, and not all good ones.  Several years ago, I received a call from Bendix Automotive, their break pad division.  I was asked to look at designing a robotic system to move brake pads from one conveyor line to another line for the purpose of baking.  I used a "gripper" for that purpose BUT, this was during the mid-80s and long before the technology was fully developed.  The forces were either too strong, thus breaking the pads or too light, dropping the pads during movement from one line to the other.  It was a bear of a project.

It amazes me that devices such as shown in you slides can pick up 15,000 eggs per hour with ease and probably minimal damage.  Shows us how far the technology has come.

Excellent post.

bobjengr
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Re: Injury Prevention
bobjengr   9/14/2014 11:08:23 AM
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Greg--very important point.  I have two clients who have "fought the good fight" relative to process producing carpal tunnel syndrome for workers.  The work accomplished is repetitive, high-speed, and extremely tiring.  One client rotates his employees in this work cell every two hours to alleviate stress to wrists and shoulders.  For the other client, the injuries were so numerous he finally decided to use a specially designed robotic system.  This system was welcomed by the employees who became operators of the system and not hands-on workers within the cell.  Prevention of injuries and cost of medical care are uppermost in the minds of most CEOs and certainly most CFOs. 

Rob Spiegel
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Re: My opinions
Rob Spiegel   11/11/2013 1:10:47 PM
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Thanks for the info and video, Jim E. I was quite improssed at PackExpo by the safety features of the robots. You could put your hand in the path of the robot and it would stop instantly. Now gearing down, jut an instant stop. Most robot producers are touting higher levels of safety.

Jim_E
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My opinions
Jim_E   11/11/2013 10:09:04 AM
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As a robot programmer with my previous company, I got to learn a bit about robotics. (Well, I still fool with them here, but only in maintenance aspects usually.)

 

The ABB FlexPicker is really amazing. Watching the youtube video of it picking up widgets off of a conveyor and putting them onto another conveyor in an endless cycle at amazingly high speed is really mesmerizing to watch.

 

The end tooling / gripper is usually one of the limiting factors in robotics use.  Some items just don't pick up well with robots.  One of the most incredible grippers to see is a "Jamming Phase Transition" gripper.  It's basically a balloon filled with coffee grounds, and the balloon can have a vacuum applied.  The gripper is placed against an item and a vacuum applied, which makes the device rigid, which conforms to what it was pressed against.  You really have to see this to believe it, and here's a video:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZKOI_lVDPpw

 

I haven't seen any industrial applications of this technology yet, but I hope it will eventually happen.

 

As for the human-safe robots, the Baxter seems more like a toy without the ability to reach pre-programmed points with accuracy.  The Universal Robotics devices seem more like industrial robots.  I played with a UR-5 at a trade-show and was impressed with it.  I tested it running into my arm and it was a bizarre to me considering that I'm used to working with giant robots which would crush me.  The reach and payload capacity of their two models aren't good enough for any of my applications yet, but I'd love to get one in my plant somehow.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Packing and Logistics
Rob Spiegel   11/6/2013 6:56:39 AM
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Yes, MyDesign. It looks like this trend is gaining ground over recent years. This is the reason Texas Instruments gave for opening new plants in Maine and Texas.

Mydesign
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Re: Packing and Logistics
Mydesign   11/5/2013 8:29:39 AM
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"If logistics costs play a bigger role than labor, it's natural that manufacturing moves closer to markets. A side benefit would be energy savings and environmental gains."

Rob, that's true.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Packing and Logistics
Rob Spiegel   10/31/2013 5:47:08 AM
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MyDesign, I think robots really help in reducing the power of labor to determine everything in where stuff is built. If logistics costs play a bigger role than labor, it's natural that manufacturing moves closer to markets. A side benefit would be energy savings and environmental gains.

Mydesign
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Re: Packing and Logistics
Mydesign   10/31/2013 3:04:06 AM
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"Thus, logistics costs may trump labor as the expense to watch -- that helps fuel the trend toward buiulding plants close to markets."

Rob, hope this Roberts can be used to reduce such expenses.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: All the packaging robots
Rob Spiegel   10/29/2013 8:24:03 PM
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Well said, far911. Robotics engineering does seem to have a bright future. And not just in packaging. Look at the robotics growth in manufacturing, medical, defense, and automotive.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Packing and Logistics
Rob Spiegel   10/29/2013 8:21:01 PM
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Good point, Mydesign. It does look like companies are putting more emphasis on packing. And while the robots reduce the need for manual labor, they do employ engineers. They also reduce the differential between labor costs in Asia and the rest of the world. Thus, logistics costs may trump labor as the expense to watch -- that helps fuel the trend toward buiulding plants close to markets.

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