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Growing Need for Optimization, Simulation in Design Process

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Rob Spiegel
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Re: Simulating the future
Rob Spiegel   11/6/2013 1:04:43 PM
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Yes, I've noticed the accent acting, too, Ann. Damian Lewis on Homeland, Lauren Cohen of The Walking Dead. It's getting common.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Simulating the future
Ann R. Thryft   11/6/2013 12:49:35 PM
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Rob, those are two interesting points you make about the current state of language. One thing my husband and I have noticed watching movies is how many actors we think are Americans are actually British, Canadian, or Australian. We've never noticed the reverse. To some extent, that's because language, in this case, the American version of English, has become not only national, but international. Regarding swearing, your point is especially interesting, since there's been a reverse movement in some sectors of society, such as in schools. In what might seem like one of the most tolerant areas of the nation, here in Santa Cruz County (CA), a local high school coach was fired in large part because he swore in front of students.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Simulating the future
Rob Spiegel   11/6/2013 7:16:02 AM
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I agree, Ann. The change in language is fast now. We're also seeing language become national. In the past, different areas of the country had their own language trajectory. Now, language is becoming the same from L.A. to small town Oklahoma. I've also noticed the Southern accent is fading among millennials. Mass media has done that.

Likewise, swearing has gone mainstream. I attrbute that to the popularity of Hip Hop and mainstrem cable shows that have taken the sting out of swearing through overuse.,

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Simulating the future
Ann R. Thryft   11/5/2013 6:26:42 PM
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Rob, I actually did agree with my brother in principle. The problem is, it doesn't apply in certain areas, especially technology. I go back and forth (mostly in conversations to myself) bemoaning the decline of the language, which to me is responsible for much of its beauty, and knowing the necessity of the need to create new terms in a fast-changing world. The rate of language change is very different depending on the type of world the humans speaking it live in: it was much slower when people lived in small, relatively isolated groups. Now, it's very very fast.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Simulating the future
Rob Spiegel   10/29/2013 3:42:05 PM
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I agree with you, Ann, even though, like your brother, my education backgound is in English. I always thought Newman misunderstood the vibrancy of the language. I believe continual change keeps our language fresh and alive. Most new words, or changes in older words to extend their meaning, are quite inventive.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Simulating the future
Ann R. Thryft   10/25/2013 1:39:37 PM
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It was hard not to be aware of verbification if you were in Silicon Valley during the 80s and 90s. I used to argue this point with my brother. He was an English teacher, so he essentially agreed with Newman. But I was working in technology when all the new under-the-hood stuff was being invented so fast it was hard to keep up, and they all needed names. And they, plus what they did, were all relatively new and unknown. So I thought it was justified and necessary.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Simulating the future
Rob Spiegel   10/25/2013 1:32:45 PM
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Yes, Edwin Newman claimed that "verbification" was the biggest culprit in the deterioration of the English language. Too bad he didn't live long enough to see texting. His response would certainly have been OMG, WTF.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Simulating the future
Ann R. Thryft   10/24/2013 12:25:15 PM
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Rob, I practically fell out of my chair laughing. "Viralize"--thanks!

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Simulating the future
Rob Spiegel   10/24/2013 12:22:38 PM
Yes, optimize is one of those verbification words -- the business world taking a noun, adj. or adverb and making it a verb. Then it goes viral. It gets viralized. Schedule was once a noun. 

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Simulating the future
Ann R. Thryft   10/23/2013 7:10:02 PM
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I thought so, Rob. Interesting, one of the speakers at this conference described the widespread use of the term "optimization" as "an overused buzzword" and that "Nearly everyone is using it these days in their marketing material" even though it's rarely performed in the complex mathematical sense using software. He said the true sense is "Computerized routine(s) to achieve goals subject to constraints."

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