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Video: 'Terminator' Polymer Has Potential for Device Design

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Rob Spiegel
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Uncanny Valley cool
Rob Spiegel   9/20/2013 10:47:28 AM
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Wow. That's impressive, Elizabeth. The video says it all. There is, however, an Uncanny Valley aspect to this.

Charles Murray
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Re: Uncanny Valley cool
Charles Murray   9/20/2013 6:30:05 PM
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I agree, Rob. It's a little spooky, although very practical. As Liz points out here, the term "Terminator" will be inextricably linked to this material.

Elizabeth M
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Re: Uncanny Valley cool
Elizabeth M   9/23/2013 4:58:30 AM
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I know what you mean, Rob. It's a little hard to believe because we don't actually see the material coming back together. But still, if it does what it says, it's a pretty incredible invention with lots of potential.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Uncanny Valley cool
Rob Spiegel   10/1/2013 2:22:34 PM
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Yes, it looks like a form of healing. I wonder if there's a medical application. 

Elizabeth M
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Re: Uncanny Valley cool
Elizabeth M   10/2/2013 4:51:49 AM
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I've been wondering about that, too, Rob. Perhaps it could be adapted to prosthetics or other kinds of medical devices that people use so that if there ever is any kind of tear or malformation, it would fix itself without needing replacement. I wonder if any of our other readers can think of good medical applications for this?

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Uncanny Valley cool
Rob Spiegel   10/2/2013 12:36:53 PM
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Good point, Elizabeth. There could be a whole range of applications for this product acorss many industries. It will be interesting to see how it pans out.

JoWiltshire
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Re: Uncanny Valley cool
JoWiltshire   10/30/2013 2:38:30 AM
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The development in the field of mobile and telecommunication is such tremendous that even the unthinkable things are coming true.

Polylysine

taimoortariq
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Impressive polymer
taimoortariq   9/21/2013 1:50:28 AM
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I just read about this polymer the other day. It is certainly very impressive, its healing ability might capture the attention of alot of material engineers which can bring alot of advancement in the field.

NadineJ
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Re: Impressive polymer
NadineJ   9/21/2013 11:13:16 AM
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I agree.  This is very cool/impressive.  But, I don't see how it could help a dropped phone unless it's shock absorbent.

Eyeglasses, high-tech tchotchkes, or toys (if it's non-toxic for children) are possibilities for mass market.  As mentioned in the article, it would be even better in manufacturing.

Greg M. Jung
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Self-Healing Applications
Greg M. Jung   9/21/2013 9:25:33 PM
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If this polymer can be commercialized, I can see it acting as a protective skin on products.  When a cut occurs on its surface, its self-healing properties could close up the opening after several hours to prevent further damage.

Elizabeth M
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Re: Self-Healing Applications
Elizabeth M   9/23/2013 5:37:31 AM
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I think that's a great application of the technology, Greg. I also see a lot of value in this for parts that are internal to electronics as well.

Greg M. Jung
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Re: Self-Healing Applications
Greg M. Jung   9/23/2013 10:27:56 AM
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Right.  Perhaps these self-healing properties can also regenerate a water-tight seal on electronic packages should a cut occur (to prevent liquid ingress).

Elizabeth M
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Re: Self-Healing Applications
Elizabeth M   9/26/2013 5:44:20 AM
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Another good application, Greg. This could be useful especially for products shipped long distances that could undergo damage.

Elizabeth M
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Re: Self-Healing Applications
Elizabeth M   11/19/2013 4:50:48 AM
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I am writing a story now about this type of polymer being applied to battery design to help a battery self-heal cracks that appear over time during operation. I think this is a great application of this material: https://energy.stanford.edu/news/scientists-invent-self-healing-battery-electrode

Stay tuned for my story. It should post this week or next.

Smoke&Flames
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Iron
But don't use it everywhere !
Smoke&Flames   9/23/2013 9:19:25 AM
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So... what would happen when you leave two of such smartphones on top of eachother... ? :-)

John E
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Silver
Cold Welding?
John E   9/23/2013 12:20:26 PM
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Could this property be used to "weld" two parts together?  Or does it just work on two surfaces that were separated from eachother?

Elizabeth M
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Re: Cold Welding?
Elizabeth M   9/24/2013 7:47:23 AM
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That is an excellent question, John E. I don't know the answer--I think it is just a material that already has been attached. That's what I understand from the video and researchers. But if the two parts were made from the same material, I don't see why that couldn't work. It could be a really good application of the material.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Cold Welding?
Ann R. Thryft   9/24/2013 12:57:11 PM
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As we've discussed before in DN, by definition a self-healing polymer is a single material that heals itself when damaged or broken. They are not adhesives that can be used to attach other materials together. We've covered self-healing and shape memory plastics before:
http://www.designnews.com/document.asp?doc_id=267531
and see links at the end of that article.



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