HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Blog

Modular Systems Are the Way Forward for Motion & Motor Control

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Threaded|Newest First|Oldest First
TJ McDermott
User Rank
Blogger
Putting the electronics in harm's way
TJ McDermott   8/26/2013 1:47:08 PM
NO RATINGS
Drive-on-motor has been tried several times, and is making a resurgence again.  Depending on how the drive and motor are integrated, failure of one can be twice as costly as when the drive and motor are more traditionally separated.

Putting the drive out in a production environment invites this sort of failure.  The production environment may be extremely hot, or extremely dirty, or extremely wet.  Any of these may lead to that more costly failure.

Finally, there's the amount of space needed for the drive when piggy-backed to the motor.  Many times the space inside a machine is sufficient for the motor only (and sometimes, not even then).

 

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Putting the electronics in harm's way
Charles Murray   8/26/2013 7:16:18 PM
NO RATINGS
I agree, TJ. I would guess that packaging has a lot to do with this trend.

TJ McDermott
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Putting the electronics in harm's way
TJ McDermott   8/26/2013 10:50:29 PM
NO RATINGS
Charles, if you're talking about packaging machinery, at the least on a food packaging floor, I would never touch these.

Palletizers, cartoners, maybe.  But not applications that would expose them to wash-down, water, etc.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Putting the electronics in harm's way
Elizabeth M   8/27/2013 7:25:42 AM
NO RATINGS
That's an interesting perspective, TJ, I suppose you are right. Is there a solution to protecting the drives?

btwolfe
User Rank
Gold
Re: Putting the electronics in harm's way
btwolfe   8/27/2013 8:50:15 AM
NO RATINGS
Protecting the drive electronics is no harder than protecting the motors. Properly designed motor controls can withstand the same harsh enviroments as the motors they control, perhaps even more so given that the electronics can be fully sealed since they have no moving parts. I would argue that the modular motor/control set is easier to replace since it has fewer connections with only power and comm, whereas a separate controller must also route sensor wiring. I have been designing and using modular motor control electronics for years and am always pleased with how clean the connectivity is in the final product.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Putting the electronics in harm's way
Elizabeth M   9/3/2013 4:46:16 AM
NO RATINGS
Thanks for this real-world perspective, btwolfe. I think this will be important given the trend of motor and motion control in the automation environment.

Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Putting the electronics in harm's way
Cabe Atwell   10/23/2013 6:18:46 PM
NO RATINGS
Modular devices and systems are a trend that's going to continue to grow.

apresher
User Rank
Blogger
Integrated Motor Drives
apresher   8/29/2013 5:56:58 PM
NO RATINGS
Several suppliers do offer IP67 rated motor-drives, which is often the level of protection used in packaging.  Obviously the specifics of the application are vital but many of these units are finding their way into packaging capitalizing on their ability to provide distributed control.

apresher
User Rank
Blogger
Integrated Motor Drives
apresher   8/29/2013 5:58:30 PM
NO RATINGS
Elizabeth, Here is link to article I worked on earlier this year on this same topic. Interesting technology. 

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Integrated Motor Drives
Elizabeth M   9/3/2013 4:09:31 AM
NO RATINGS
Thanks for the link, Al. I will take a look at that article.

Partner Zone
More Blogs
MIT’s Senseable City Lab recently announced the program’s next big project: “Local Warming.” The concept involves saving on energy by heating the occupants within a room, not the room itself.
The fun factor continues to draw developers to Linux. This open-source system continues to succeed in the market and in the hearts and minds of developers. Design News will delve into this territory with next week's Continuing Education Class titled, “Introduction to Linux Device Drivers.”
The new draw-it-on-a-napkin is the CAD program. As CAD programs become more ubiquitous and easier to use, they have replaced 2D sketching for early concepting.
A University of Chicago graduate has invented a compact elliptical trainer that lets people work out at their desk while they work.
New developments in sensors span a wide range of applications in all areas of manufacturing and plant automation.
Design News Webinar Series
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
5/13/2014 10:00 a.m. California / 1:00 p.m. New York / 6:00 p.m. London
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Aug 4 - 8, Introduction to Linux Device Drivers
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: August 12 - 14
Sponsored by igus
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service