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3D Print Your Own Analog Camera

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Rob Spiegel
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Your own old fashioned camera
Rob Spiegel   7/23/2013 8:05:11 AM
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Very impressive, Ann. Actually, I think that's pretty good time considering the complexity of a camera. Heck, I've seen Gadget Freak videos that take nearly as long to download as this camera takes to print. If you don't have to babysit the printer, 15 hours isn't so long. But I would guess you have to hang around the printer for each individual part.

far911
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Silver
Re: Your own old fashioned camera
far911   7/23/2013 8:22:06 AM
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Impressive stuff indeed. I'm glad 3D printing is making its way down to the educational level by allowing young minds experiment with the technology and come up with new ideas. 

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Your own old fashioned camera
Rob Spiegel   7/23/2013 8:25:32 AM
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I agree, far911. The idea of sharing design changes is also a nice feature: crowdsourcing for camera improvements.

GTOlover
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Platinum
Where do you purchase/devolp film?
GTOlover   7/23/2013 10:44:23 AM
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I know the film and developing can still be done, but my how it has shrank! I remember the day when you found this stuff everywhere. Doubt that this will revive the analog film market.

The next generation should be to print a digital camera. Or at least the frame as the insides would have to be made conventionally.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Your own old fashioned camera
Ann R. Thryft   7/23/2013 1:11:48 PM
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Thanks Rob--that's pretty funny: "Gadget Freak videos that take nearly as long to download as this camera takes to print." Yes, I'm pretty sure you need to watch the printer during the whole process.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Where do you purchase/devolp film?
Ann R. Thryft   7/23/2013 1:19:24 PM
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GTOlover, good point. It's been awhile since I took pictures with my analog Olympus and tried to get them printed. A quick web search on "film developing" tells me the drugstore chains still do that. Also, there are still professional photographers who use non-digital cameras to do things that still can't be done with digital ones, so there must still be at least some professional photo labs around.

Charles Murray
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Re: Your own old fashioned camera
Charles Murray   7/23/2013 4:21:37 PM
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I agree, Rob. Fifteen hours to print and an hour to assemble is better than I expected. Cool story.

Nancy Golden
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Platinum
Re: Your own old fashioned camera
Nancy Golden   7/23/2013 5:48:50 PM
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It is a nice accomplishment done in the spirit of shareware which is good to see...I particularly like his modular approach which I think simplifies the process for anyone wanting to build one. 

Battar
User Rank
Platinum
Futility
Battar   7/24/2013 9:21:04 AM
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So here we have someone suggesting using the latest 3D printing technology to create a 3rd rate example of a technological product which was obsolete a decade ago.

This redefines the phrase "an exercise in futility".

EricMJones
User Rank
Gold
Futility
EricMJones   7/24/2013 10:00:36 AM
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I'm with Battar on this. I don't see the point and hardly think publishing this is worthwhile. Sorry. At the very least, if the camera had some utility or features that marked it as an interesting and clever creation, I might say "good job!" But it's hardly more than a box.

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