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Sulfur-Based Battery Outperforms Lithium-Ion in Tests

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Charles Murray
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Re: Perhaps promising
Charles Murray   7/9/2013 7:39:04 PM
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I agree with your statement about multiple battery solutions, Rob. In the future, I think some cars will use batteries designed for high power (hybrids), high energy (electric cars) and high cycle life.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Perhaps promising
Rob Spiegel   6/27/2013 11:14:03 PM
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Actually, Elizabeth, I used the wrong term. The platform sharing is when a car comany uses the same platflorm for more than one branded vehicle. The transfer of technology happens -- at least in part -- on an online technollogy exchange called yet2.com. Apparently, 25 percent of auto technology is bought and sold there. Plus, suppliers such as Seimens are pushng for auto technology to be  released as industry standards.

Yet2.com:

http://marketplace.yet2.com/app/about/about/press?page=press9

Cabe Atwell
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Re: Details...?
Cabe Atwell   6/27/2013 11:05:58 PM
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If the battery ever fails and produces a leak of some kind it will undoubtedly be easy to detect by smell alone.

C

Charles Murray
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Re: Details...?
Charles Murray   6/27/2013 7:59:08 PM
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 You're right about the cost advantages of sulfur, Liz. Sulfur is (almost literally) dirt cheap. Cobalt, which is often used in lithium-ion batteries, is far, far more expensive than sulfur.

Elizabeth M
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Re: Perhaps promising
Elizabeth M   6/27/2013 4:33:31 AM
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That's a good analogy, Rob. I wasn't aware of what was happening in the auto industry. How are they sharing platforms? Would the same type of thing be applicable to battery researchers?

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Perhaps promising
Rob Spiegel   6/26/2013 7:24:43 PM
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I'd like to see some sharing in this field. If the automakers can share platforms, than I'd think battery developers could as well.

Elizabeth M
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Re: Perhaps promising
Elizabeth M   6/26/2013 4:49:04 AM
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The thing is, Rob, that is probably best. But it would also be good if some of these researchers could get on the same page, at least with some of the complementary technologies. I know there are two separate research groups, for example, working on the use of nanotechnology and silicon to improve Li batteries...but I think for now they are separate projects. While I think there won't be a one-size-fits-all solution in the future, some of these solutions could be combined, I think, for a better battery.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Perhaps promising
Rob Spiegel   6/25/2013 3:10:30 PM
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I'd bet on multiple solutions, Elizabeth. I don't see one solution pulling away decisively.

Elizabeth M
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Re: Perhaps promising
Elizabeth M   6/25/2013 6:31:27 AM
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I hope it's the latter, Rob. Why should there just be one type of battery design? I think maybe having choice and perhaps finetuning some chemistries for certain applications more than others is the best way to go.

Elizabeth M
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Re: Details...?
Elizabeth M   6/25/2013 6:26:06 AM
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Hi, Strambo, these are good points. To clarify, I actually believe I made a mistake when I said it replaces lithium with sulfur. It does not, it uses sulfur in conjunction with lithium. Sorry about that; it is the only error I made. Here is a link to Oak Ridge's press release with more details: http://www.ornl.gov/info/press_releases/get_press_release.cfm?ReleaseNumber=mr20130605-00


In terms of the four-times issue...I think I explain it in the article. See this paragraph at the bottom:

However, lithium-sulfur batteries deliver about half the voltage of lithium-ion versions, so the eightfold capacity increase the Oak Ridge battery demonstrated gives it roughly four times the gravimetric energy density of lithium-ion batteries, Liang said.


Hope that helps explain things.

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